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OAA Annual Conference 2020

Friday May 29 2020 - Beanfield Centre and Hotel X, Toronto

OAA Conference 2012

Conference Program



Friday May 29 2020

Registration: 7:30 AM – 4:00 PM
Refreshment Break: 3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sponsor Displays: 7:30 AM – 1:45 PM
8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

07AC

Bid Theory & Bid Practice

This session will review the legal framework in which construction bidding—and other forms of procurement—are carried on. This session will also review a set of Instructions to Bidders in an effort to demonstrate how theory and practice merge. The rationale for various clauses in the Instructions to Bidders will be explained.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand bid theory and the development of the bidding contract.
  2. Appreciate the history of Contract A.
  3. Understand the architect’s responsibilities.
  4. Know how to approach bid documents.
  5. Understand the broader public-sector bidding/procurement and requirements.


Speaker(s)

Michael Swartz

Michael Swartz, partner at WeirFoulds LLP, Barristers & Solicitors, devotes his practice to construction law. He represents clients from across the construction industry, in all aspects of projects and construction-related issues. Michael represents clients from across Ontario in his construction law practice. He is involved in every facet of the construction industry, including strategy development, from project inception to completion. He is experienced in structuring tendering and contract documents related to all aspects of development. Michael’s practical and time-saving advice has resolved wide-ranging issues arising from procurement and contract disputes and lien, trust, and delay claims. Michael appears frequently before various boards, tribunals and courts, including the Ontario and Superior Courts of Justice, the Ontario Court of Appeal and the Federal Court of Canada. He speaks regularly to various associations and groups on topical issues concerning the construction industry. He provides clients with timely and relative updates on court cases, decisions and statute changes. Michael has taught construction law courses for the Ontario General Contractors Association (OGCA) and George Brown College since 2006. In 2017, Michael was selected by the Toronto Construction Association (TCA) Nominations & Awards Committee as the winner of the 2016 TCIC Chancellor’s Award of Excellence. He is also listed in the Canadian Legal Lexpert Directory as a repeatedly recommended lawyer in Construction Law.

 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

55CE

Insurance 101 for Ontario architects

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

The program includes an introduction and brief history of insurance, including the key concepts and terms an architect in practice needs to understand to be conversant about insurance. Key provisions of professional liability insurance will be explained, with discussion of the significance for the architect, including the consequences of failing to adhere to the requirements. This is supplemented by discussion about the Pro-Demnity program and important features that distinguish that program from other available insurance.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about insurance generally, and professional liability insurance in particular.
  2. Understand the professional and legal context within which architects provide their professional services and awareness of some of the most common aspects of practice that generate claims against architects.
  3. Gain a better understanding of the features and benefits to Ontario architects of the mandatory professional liability insurance program provided by the company they own.
  4. Understand how professional liability insurance works through real-life examples.

Speaker(s)

Stephen White, F.C.I.I., C.I.P

Stephen White has had a long career in the insurance industry in the United Kingdom and in Canada. He has assisted Pro-Demnity in the preparation and delivery of several continuing education seminars including previous “sold out” versions of Insurance 101 delivered in Toronto, Markham, and Ottawa in the spring of 2019. Stephen also teaches insurance-related subjects for the insurance industry and acts as a consultant and expert witness on insurance-related matters.

John Hackett, B.Arch., OAA, FRAIC

John Hackett is Vice-President, Practice Risk Management for Pro-Demnity Insurance Company. In that role, he counsels Ontario architects on questions about insurance and liability concerns. He serves as moderator and presenter for many Pro-Demnity Loss Prevention seminars.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

56CE

Carbon-Neutral Retrofit of a Heritage Community Hall

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

The 100-year-old Eden Mills Community Hall has been renovated over 11 years from an energy wastrel to virtual carbon neutrality. It is both the social centre of the village and the centrepiece of its very ambitious ‘Eden Mills Going Carbon-Neutral’ project. That project has earned national and international recognition, most recently as the subject of a feature article in the July 2019 edition of Maclean’s and a recipient of Canada’s Clean 50 Top Award.

In a series of phases, the building has reduced energy purchase by 91 per cent, energy cost by 77 per cent (despite inflation), and carbon emissions by 94 per cent. It very possibly may be the most energy-efficient retrofit of a public heritage building in Canada.

The savings would be greater if a number of qualitative and operational criteria had not been considered to be of higher importance. These include greatly improved year-round comfort, use of one propane furnace to supplement the slow temperature pickup of the two air-source heat pumps, and a policy of imposing no energy limitations on rental groups (such as cooking and baking, adjusting thermostats, opening windows, etc.).

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the procedural methodology for undertaking the audit, design, and phased construction in the energy retrofit of a heritage community building which had to remain in use over the multi-year process.
  2. Learn the technical aspects and limitations of retrofitting heritage structures.
  3. Understand the value of drawing on local volunteer skills for design, engineering, contract documents, and construction, as well as ways to communicate with and engage the community at every step of the way.
  4. Learn a suggested prioritization of retrofit measures.

Speaker(s)

Charles Simon, OAA, Hon. OALA

The principal of Charles Simon Architect has an international reputation in environmental design, won numerous design awards (including for the Kitchener-Waterloo Environmental Learning Centre), and taught in a number of countries. He has been called “the grandfather of passive solar in Canada.” Charles received a Lifetime Achievement Award from the Toronto Green Building Council. For his role in founding the ‘Eden Mills Going Carbon-Neutral’ project, he received the Ontario Agricultural College Volunteer Recognition Award (2009) and the Queen Elizabeth ll Diamond Jubilee Medal (2012).

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

57CE

Business Management – Finance

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

Effective financial management of a firm relies on establishing a financial system and applying discipline to manage resources. If the firm’s financial management processes are not maintained regularly, the organization may run poorly and be unable to achieve its goals and objectives. This session will help you develop an understanding on how to exercise control over finances through tools such as ratio analysis, financial forecasting, and cost and profit control. 

This presentation is a version of the Finance Module offered within the OAA Course - Fundamentals of Running an Architectural Practice (formerly Starting an Architectural Practice).

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the components of a financial management system in an architectural practice.
  2. Understand and apply the main Key Performance Indicators to set targets for, and to measure performance.
  3. Understand the concepts of financial statements and cash flow management.
  4. Discuss common financial issues facing architectural firms.

Speaker(s)

Basima Roshan, MBA, CPA

Basima Roshan leads Innovia Partners’ Finance, Change Management, and Business Transformation practice. She has an extensive background in working with Fortune-500 companies in planning and managing both cross-functional business operations and complex internal integration projects, increasing their effectiveness and profit. Basima guides Innovia’s clients through the changes in structure, processes, and people they need to meet business and market challenges. Currently, Basima advises several leading architectural firms and creative businesses to assess opportunities, facilitate strategic decisions, and drive successful implementations. She has served as interim director of finance for a large Canadian architectural practice, providing focused counsel and leadership with the goal of helping the organization achieve long-term financial sustainability. Basima has a Queen’s MBA, holds a bachelor of commerce (finance), and is a Chartered Public Accountant (CPA).

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

58CE

Learning and Teaching in the Age of Digital Disruption

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The traditional practice of architecture in North America is radically and rapidly changing. Amid such digital disruption, who is responsible for teaching and learning after formal education ends? The answer necessitates strategic planning and conscious thought on how staff gain the knowledge required to leverage new tools being embedded into workflows. Learn how creating a learning-based culture, paired with actively supporting teaching, leads to personal and professional growth while enriching the staff experience. Workforce knowledge is, without a doubt, essential to sustaining a relevant practice—this session explores how it can be supported as an integral part of a successful workflow.

We are operating in an era of marked advancement, the rapidly innovating A/E/C landscape necessitates effective ways of responding to the requirements of staying relevant in an everchanging work environment. Attendees will learn how a 150-person firm applied key concepts of education into its practice, gaining an appreciation for this strategy and taking away how it can be leveraged as a powerful tool to support staff and promote relevancy, satisfaction, and longevity in careers.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how in the rapidly innovating A/E/C landscape effective ways of responding to the requirements of staying relevant are essential.
  2. Learn how a 150-person firm applied key concepts of education into its practice; gain an appreciation for this strategy and take away how it can be leveraged as a powerful tool to support staff.
  3. Leverage education and learning to harness and promote relevancy, satisfaction, and longevity in careers, while enhancing the employee experience.
  4. Learn how creating a learning-based culture, paired with actively supporting teaching, leads to tapping into unexplored passions of your workforce.

Speaker(s)

Ellen Bensky, BA, Dip.Arch.Tech. (Hon), CanBIM P1

Ellen Bensky contributes on a daily basis to the advancement of architectural technology and virtual design not only in her firm, but also industry-wide through her initiatives and dedication. Passionate for education, Ellen is especially proud of spearheading an internal academy that provides a comprehensive learning and teaching platform for the firm. Through her current role, Ellen is able to engage daily in the process of successfully leveraging business needs and architectural realities, driving her quest for operational excellence. An experienced speaker, she has presented at local and international at colleges and universities, as well as industry events including KA Connect 2018 and 2019, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s (RAIC’s) 2018 conference, and BiLT Australia/New Zealand 2019. She has several engagements scheduled in Canada, the United States, and Europe for the remainder of the year. Ellen is the proud recipient of the CanBIM 2017 Professional Achievement Award.

Steve Nonis, B.Arch., OAA, AANB, AAPEI, MRAIC, CanBIM P3, LEED AP

A partner at Turner Fleischer, Steve Nonis is driven to achieve the optimal connection between technology and design. At the forefront of the firm’s BIM initiatives, he was instrumental in TF’s pioneering efforts to apply 3D design processes. Passionate for sharing knowledge, Steve has spoken as part of Autodesk University, at local and international education institutions, and recently at the RAIC’s 2018 Festival.

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

59CE

Practice Tip 39.1 as a Component of a Go/No-Go Decision

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Some firms tend to respond to every Request for Proposal (RFP) that comes their way. The challenge then becomes how to evaluate objectively which opportunities will yield the best outcomes within manageable risk levels. To assist in deciding which projects make sense, a go/no-go matrix becomes an important tool for any firm.

This interactive session will focus on evaluating an RFP through a lens of “risk,” understanding how to apply and integrate Practice Tip (PT) 39.1 as part of the decision-making process as well as understanding tools and resources available to help your firm make the best decisions when it comes to project opportunities.

Come prepared with questions. We will attempt to provide answers.

Note: Prior to attending the session, we recommend you download and become familiar with Practice Tip 39.1, Best Practices for Review of RFP Languages and Supplementary Conditions to OAA and other Client-Architect Contracts.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand a basic go/no-go decision matrix.
  2. Understand why Practice Tip 39.1 was created.
  3. Learn how to apply the content of Practice Tip 39.1 when reviewing RFPs and contract terms and conditions.
  4. Identify risks that could affect the decision of your firm to submit.

Speaker(s)

Allen N. Humphries, BES, B.Arch., Architect (Retired)

Allen Humphries is an OAA Practice Advisor, providing a broad range of practice advisory services in support of architects and their practices. He has bachelor of environmental studies and bachelor of architecture degrees from the University of Waterloo, and an honours diploma in computer programming and systems analysis. Allen brings a wealth of experience in all facets of practice, gained over the years in small, medium, and large architectural practices as well as in corporate and government environments. He has taught at the community college level. Allen has also served on a number of CSA standards-writing committees and OAA committees. He was recently chair of the Construction Contract Administration Committee (CCAC) and was also a Practice Committee member. Allen is involved as an Admission Course instructor (live and on-line), and helped write the CCA course components. Allen has solid knowledge of both the internal and external operations of the OAA, and has valuable industry insight.

Mélisa Audet, B.Sc.Arch., M.Arch., Architect

Mélisa Audet is the Manager of Practice Advisory Services at the OAA. She works alongside Practice Advisors to coordinate the delivery of a broad range of practice services that support members and architectural firms within the public interest. Mélisa obtained both her bachelor of sciences and master of architecture from McGill University and also a certificate in project management from Ryerson University. Fully bilingual (French and English), she has extensive experience in private practices, the Federal Government, as well as working for a large Construction Management firm. This wide range of professional experience and exposure is a great asset, bringing practical insight from different points of view from our industry. Mélisa joined OAA Council in December 2017 and was Vice President Regulatory from January 2018 to December 2019. She was an active member of McGill Alumni of Toronto Board of Directors from 2014–2018 and the Toronto Society of Architects (TSA) from 2017-2018.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

60CE

Designing Cities and Homes as Exercise Machines

 

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The obesity epidemic has affected many nations. In Canada, by some estimates, more than six million Canadian adults age 20 to 64 are overweight and nearly three million are obese. The common tendency is to blame people’s dietary choices and sedentary habits. Yet, it can also be argued that poor urban planning practices have largely contributed to a lack of active lifestyles. Low-density suburban sprawl, long commutes, diminishing land for green areas, and the elimination of sidewalks from local streets are some aspects that have led to reduced physical activity, among residents of all ages.

Reversing course and regarding the community and the home as exercise machines need to be a top priority of urban planners and public health officials. Public transit, commercial hubs walking distance away, jogging tracks, bike paths, and play spaces should become mandatory features of new residential development. In his presentation, Dr. Avi Friedman, professor of architecture at McGill University, recipient of the World Habitat Award, and a practising architect, will illustrate the decline of community planning for healthy living and outline measures that can be reintroduced to foster active lifestyles. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about the fundamental changes in our lifestyle that merit a new paradigm.
  2. Understand how to design homes for active living.
  3. Learn about designing communities for active living.
  4. Understand detailed interventions in design.

Speaker

Avi Friedman, BArch (Technion), MArch (McGill), PhD (U de Montreal), OAQ, IAA

Avi Friedman received his bachelor’s degree in architecture and town planning from the Israel Institute of Technology, his master’s degree from McGill University, and his doctorate from the University of Montreal. In 1988, he co-founded the Affordable Homes Program at the McGill School of Architecture where he teaches. He also holds an honorary professor position in Lancaster University in the U.K. Avi is known for his housing innovation and in particular for the Grow Home and Next Home designs. He’s the author of 23 books and a columnist for several media outlets. He is the principal of Avi Friedman Consultants Inc. and the recipient of numerous awards including the Manning Innovation Award, Lifetime Achievement Award from Sustainable Buildings Canada, and the World Habitat Award. In 2000, he was selected by Wallpaper magazine as one of 10 people from around the world most likely to change the way we live.

 

 
 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

61CE

The Intent of OBC 5.10.4 Other Fenestration Assemblies

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The design, construction, and installation of smaller punch or ganged glazing systems have been regulated through standards and building codes for decades. However, glazing systems like window wall, curtain wall, sloped glazing, storefront, and the newer glazed architectural structures from other countries are not strictly covered by these codes. Architects, designers, and AHJs have haphazardly turned to various standards developed in North America and other countries in an attempt to regulate their use, but with limited success and inconsistent results.

This shortcoming in regulation was addressed in the 2015 NBC under Sub-section 5.9.3 Other Fenestration Assemblies. The OBC adopted these changes for projects starting in January 2020 under Sub-section 5.10.3. Requirements include resistance to structural and environmental loads, air leakage, water penetration, heat transfer, and condensation resistance. Guidance in Appendix A describes background and intent behind the requirements, as well as definitions. This session will explain the intent and application of these requirements by those who were directly involved in their development in the NBC.

Learning Objectives

    1. Gain awareness of the new OBC requirements for curtain wall, window wall, storefront glazing, and glazed architectural structures.
    2. Understand how performance criteria can be demonstrated through code-accepted standards for laboratory and field testing.
    3. Gain the ability to change architectural practice to reflect these new provisions.
    4. Learn the definitions of these systems.

Speaker(s)

David Kayll, FMA, P.Eng.

David Kayll is a senior building science specialist, project manager, and principal in Morrison Hershfield’s Ottawa office. He has over 30 years of experience in building science, building envelope performance, energy performance, and facility management on multidisciplined architectural/engineering teams in new and renovation construction on heritage, institutional, industrial, commercial, and residential facilities. His experience includes 10 years on the East Coast, five on the West Coast, and more than 15 in the National Capital Area. David provides facility management consulting expertise on carbon-neutral studies, asset management plans, strategic accommodation strategies, and recommissioning plans. He is a member of the National Codes Commission Standing Committee on Environmental Separation and has served on the 2015 and 2020 code cycles, and will continue into the 2025 cycle.

 

 
 
 
 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

62CE

The Art of Leading Change While Preserving Profitability

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Empowering change is an intensely personal thing for leaders of architectural firms. It requires everyone in the firm to think or act differently. Small wonder that change is such a difficult and frustrating item on virtually every firm’s agenda. The problem for most leaders is that leading change is unlike any other task they have confronted.

Leading a successful change effort is not like a mechanic fine-tuning an engine or an MD treating one physical ailment at a time—these activities consist of a fixed set of relationships. Leading change at the firm level typically involves several different projects simultaneously as part of the change effort. The key here is not dealing with each project in isolation, but rather linking and balancing all the pieces simultaneously while being cognizant of the proper sequencing and pacing of the activities.

We will explore the important interconnections among leadership, strategy, finance, and operations during a successful change initiative. If you are a leader and are looking to enhance your change management skill set, this session is for you. Join us for a rich discussion and leave with tools to use immediately back at the office!

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn the top best practices for implementing lasting valuable change to ensure a healthy and profitable practice.
    2. Gain an appreciation of the seven most important financial Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to determine a firm’s performance during a change initiative (includes a summary write-up on the KPIs and how to calculate them).
    3. Broaden your change management skill set to inspire your people during the change process (includes a coaching best practices checklist for learning new ways of doing things).
    4. Benefit from insights into the eight primary responsibilities of leaders during a change initiative.

Speaker(s)

Paul Smith, MA (Econ.), MBA

An experienced and engaging speaker, motivator and leader, Paul Smith is the president and founder of Flywheel, a Toronto-based boutique management consulting firm. He obtained an MA in Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and earned an MBA (Honours) from the Richard Ivey School of Business. Paul has spent 20 years working side by side with senior management to navigate long-term change efforts. He spends most of his time listening to his clients and their employees, and is routinely asked to speak at important industry events.

 

 
 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

63CE

Unconscious Bias in the Profession of Architecture

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Ontario is home to more than 12 million people and is Canada’s most multicultural province. There are people from 200 countries, speaking as many as 130 different languages, who call the province their home. With this level of diversity, many professions experience bias in the workplace. What does this mean to the profession of architecture? How can you create a more inclusive workplace so that you attract and retain diverse architects into your firms? It starts with education!

This session will introduce participants to the concept of Unconscious Bias. Through self-reflection, practical examples and discussion, participants will explore how unconscious bias shapes behaviours and choices in the workplace and which strategies can be implemented to manage its potentially damaging impact.

Learning Objectives

    1. Define conscious and unconscious bias, and describe how biases are acquired.
    2. Use a cyclical model to analyze the impact of bias (discrimination and micro-inequities/macroaggressions).
    3. Recognize workplace behaviours and decisions that may be influenced by bias.
    4. Apply strategies to manage the effects of unconscious bias in the workplace.

Speaker(s)

Loreli Buenaventura

Loreli Buenaventura has advanced the inclusion goals of leading Canadian organizations at the community, national, and global levels, including KPMG, Scotiabank, and RBC. She also helped launch TRIEC’s Mentoring Partnership Program–recipient of the Canadian Urban Institute Award for Leadership in City Initiatives, and often draws from her seasoned early career in media and public relations. 

Currently, Loreli is head of diversity and inclusion for HSBC Canada and an associate with the Canadian Centre for Diversity and Inclusion (CCDI), working with HR and business leaders to integrate inclusion, innovation, and diversity of thought as a strategic advantage.

 

 
 
 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

64CE

Score More With A Strategic Business Development Approach

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Does your firm employ a “hail Mary” approach to business development? Are you waiting until the two-minute warning to develop your strategy? Do you find yourself unable to execute a solid offensive game plan? Are you consistently making it to the red zone, but unable to cross the goal line? Implementing a strategic business development approach driven by a priority-based client management system allows you to place more focus on specific targets, enabling you to convert more of your leads into projects. This session will guide you through the development of your strategic business development playbook and help you win more work!

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn the process of developing a successful business development program.
    2. Learn how to organize and maximize business development efforts to see a better return on investment.
    3. Learn how to prioritize clients and client engagement based on priority.
    4. Learn tools to improve your business development program and investment.

Speaker(s)

Jennifer Newman, CPSM

Jennifer Newman draws from her 20+ years of A/E/C industry experience to help firms grow their people and profits. She has developed a reputation for helping firms improve processes, create better leaders, train and retain talent, convert doers into successful doer-sellers, differentiate through client experience, create award-winning campaigns, increase brand loyalty, and develop winning strategies that lead to successful firm growth. With a firm belief that business development is everyone’s business, Jen has a passion for helping firms create and implement business development strategy while building all-star teams of doer-sellers, business developers, and marketers. Her background in firm leadership has helped raise a new generation of firm leaders and doer-sellers that are confidently and enthusiastically helping their firms grow. Jen understands the best results come from training that is customized, interactive, utilizing real world exercises with action items, and methods of accountability to ensure learning is extended to implementation. She has a knack for pushing people out of their comfort zone to exceed their goals. Jen’s ultimate purpose is in elevating firms through strategy and training. With an energetic and enthusiastic style, she makes growth fun. Jen holds a BS in Organizational Management and Development. Throughout her career, she has served in leadership positions for numerous industry and community organizations such as SMPS, ASHE, APWA, WTS, and the YMCA, earning recognition for her service. 

 

 
 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 AM

65CE

Handling Workplace Discrimination and Harassment

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Like many professionals, Architects face the significant challenge of harassment and discrimination in the workplace. This problem includes issues such as sexual harassment and age and gender discrimination.

In this interactive session, attendees will learn from an experienced employment and human rights lawyer. The session will help attendees learn the difference between harassment and discrimination and provide tools for identifying, preventing, and handling workplace violence and harassment. Employees will come away with a better

knowledge of their rights and steps they may take if they believe they are being subjected to this treatment. While employers will learn how to ensure that they are in compliance with the Occupational Health & Safety Act and the Ontario Human Rights Code in order to improve workplace culture and avoid costly complaints. Both employers and employees will better understand their accountability and responsibilities.

The speaker will provide real case scenarios along with practical tools and guidance for handling workplace discrimination, harassment, and violence.

Learning Objectives:

  1. Identify the responsibilities of the organization in the creation and maintenance of a workplace free from discrimination and harassment
  2. Recognize behaviours which may constitute discrimination or harassment 
  3. Understand how to respond to a situation involving workplace discrimination or harassment
  4. Know the roles and responsibilities of management in addressing and resolving
  5. workplace situations involving discrimination or harassment

Speakers

Nicole Simes, Employment & Human Rights Lawyer 

Nicole Simes is a Lawyer with MacLeod Law Firm, practicing exclusively in the areas of employment, labour, and human rights law. Nicole regularly advises individuals, employers, and service providers on a wide-range of issues including contracts, wrongful and constructive dismissal, accommodation, and other human rights matters. Nicole has experience litigating before the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario, the Courts, the Ontario Labour Relations Board and the Workplace Safety and Appeals Tribunal. Nicole strives to educate the public about employment and human rights law through accessible blogs, social media, and presentations to community groups.

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

66CE

Cx 101: Basics of Commissioning for Architects

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Commissioning has been a critical component of successful projects for decades. Today, it is more important than ever with building systems becoming ever more complex and clients demanding value from their high-performance facilities. This presentation covers the basics of mechanical and electrical systems commissioning for both LEED-certified and non-LEED projects. It is intended for architects who want to understand the why and how of modern commissioning and how they can successfully incorporate commissioning into their projects. Basic terms and concepts will be explained with a goal of creating an understanding of the purpose of commissioning as well as the history of commissioning, the process followed, and the unique challenges (and how to overcome them).

The role of the architect as the prime project leader requires that you be fully conversant with commissioning terms without having direct responsibility for specific actions. The purpose of this conference is to provide you with the tools you’ll need to understand the commissioning process from start to finish. Focus will also be provided for architects who are familiar with the process of commissioning, but would still benefit from a refresher on the realities of commissioning.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn commissioning terms and approaches.
  2. Gain a better understanding of mechanical and electrical systems operation in buildings.
  3. Understand commissioning team roles and responsibilities
  4. Learn about commissioning scheduling.


Speaker(s)


Rino Zan, P.Eng.

Rino Zan, P.Eng., is a partner and manager of the Commissioning Department at Morrison Hershfield Ltd. He has degrees in both mechanical (University of Toronto) and electrical (University of Rome) engineering and has over 25 years of experience as an engineer in the Canadian market.



10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

67CE

The Mindful Advantage: Work Happier, Not Harder!

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The world teaches us that if we work harder, longer hours and experience more stress, then we’ll be more successful and, as a result, happier. Significant research into success and happiness are conclusive that this is simply backward. If you truly want your company to be successful, it must start with happy employees. The well-being of your employees = the well-being of your business. The good news? There are specific, simple, and quick methods to make us happier—even at work—and mindfulness is one of them.

This interactive presentation shares simple techniques to bring into the workplace now for a new approach to success, and happier employees who communicate better, are more positive, energetic, and commited to the work they do.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the default mode of our mind and how it creates stress, negativity, and overwhelm at work.
    2. Learn/practice simple techniques to manage workplace stress.
    3. Learn/practice simple techniques to boost focus/productivity.
    4. Learn/practice simple techniques to increase resilience and thrive in a changing environment.

Speaker(s)

Trish Tutton, BAH/RYT 200

Trish Tutton is a speaker and mindfulness teacher, a graduate of theatre school, and a lifelong student. She is curious about how being more present can make us happier and healthier. Her passion for sharing mindfulness comes from her own experience of working in the corporate and non-profit sector. During this time, she experienced the incredible benefits of having a mindfulness practice. She was more energized, happy, and focused, and felt better equipped to manage the stresses of her work. She has taught hundreds of professionals how to transition from overwhelmed and ineffective to focused and efficient.

 

 
 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

68CE

Passive Cooling: Designing NZE Buildings using Earth Tubes

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The rapid climate change recently identified in Canada, in combination with stricter energy codes, forces the architectural and engineering professions to embrace new design considerations. Traditionally, heating energy has been the most significant energy use across Canadian climate zones, but with climate change and enhanced envelopes, the cooling energy is increasing. 

This session will explore a range of passive cooling approaches including earth tubes, facade treatments, and hybrid ventilation systems as a means of reducing energy use, lowering carbon, and providing comfortable buildings. We will explore how these passive cooling methods are harnessed to enhance overall design and where traditional mechanical budgets can be reassigned toward whole building design for maximum benefit.

The session will provide a focus on earth tube systems--how they work, particular design considerations, and a performance review of recent installations. We will also share findings from a design process where energy modelling was used to predict thermal comfort and building energy performance along with envelope and mechanical system considerations.

We are keen to make this session interactive and will invite the audience/participants to share proposed building designs upon which we will demonstrate how to incorporate an earth tube system and other passive cooling techniques—and present budget estimates, energy savings, and paybacks.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn why passive cooling systems are an important part of our energy-efficient future to meet net-zero energy building performance.
    2. Understand how to design and select appropriate passive cooling systems for different building types (e.g. residential and non-residential, commercial, education, institution, industrial).
    3. Understand the methodology for assessing the design performance of passive cooling systems in meeting energy code compliance.
    4. Learn how to optimize architectural design to meet energy code and thermal comfort with trade-offs of building envelope and passive cooling systems.

Speaker(s)

Trevor Butler, P.Eng., PEO, C.Eng., LEED AP BD+C

Trevor Butler is principal of Archineers, and a qualified civil and mechanical engineer, with over 25 years of professional design experience delivering integrated sustainable designs into the built environment. He is the Professional Engineer of Record on Canada’s first certified Passive House non-residential building. He is a pioneer for passive cooling technology in Canada focusing on cost-effective methods to improve health and well-being for building occupants and manages quality through the Lufthaus process. With an interest in water conservation and wastewater management, Trevor has developed seasonal irrigation systems using clean greywater direct to gardens reducing the potable water consumed while reclaiming nutrients for the soil.

Martina Soderlund, P.Eng., BEMP, LEED AP BD+C

Martina Soderlund is principal of reLoad Sustainable Design Inc., an energy advisory firm specializing in sustainability, energy modelling, and building performance. She is a professional engineer, has ASHRAE certification as a Building Energy Model Professional (BEMP), and is a LEED accredited professional (LEED AP BD+C). Recognized in her industry for technical expertise, she was a member of the Technical Advisory Group for Canada Green Building Council (2013–2015); was on the first Executive Committee of the International Building Performance Simulation Association–BC Chapter (IBPSA-BC) and initiated and chaired a group of 30 architects across North America on High Performance Building and Regenerative Design (2014-2016).

 

 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

69CE

SB-10 & OAA PT-36 Ontario’s Energy Code Basics

 

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

In 2016, the OAA issued a series of Practice Tips (PTs) on energy conservation regulations, ASHRAE 90.1, SB-10, and SB-12, which offer architects guidance on the content of the standard and regulations. The PTs are made freely available to owners, designers, builders, suppliers, and AHJs to help make Ontario one of the most progressive energy and GHG jurisdictions in North America. This presentation will review these PTs and the referenced standards. More specifically, the presentation will address SB-10’s prescriptive solutions and the latest changes issued by the Ministry of Municipal Affairs and Housing (MMAH).

Learning Objectives

    1. Be exposed to expose the energy conservation resources available from the OAA.
    2. Review the fundamentals of building envelope energy transfer.
    3. Understand the building envelope and GHG emission requirements of Ontario’s Energy Code, SB-10.
    4. Learn about the prescriptive compliance options.

Speaker(s)

Gerry Conway, OAA, FRAIC, LEED AP

Gerry Conway is a strong voice for the ethical and comprehensive practice of architecture and the critical role of architects in art, science, culture, and society. These deeply held values have guided the many professionals he has mentored. His expertise in best practice, building science, technology, contract documents, and contract administration, along with his energetic and collaborative style, has earned him the respect of clients, contractors, colleagues, and authorities. This expertise and commitment led to Gerry’s appointment to the Engineers, Architects and Building Officials (EABO) joint liaison group in 2010, OAA PC in 2011, the 2017 OBC Part 3 TAC, the OAA/PEO CLP and the OAA’s Sub-Committee on Building Codes and Regulation (SCOBCAR). Gerry serves on the board of directors of the Building Envelope Council Ottawa Region (BECOR). Gerry is a RAIC Fellow. In 2016, he coauthored three OAA Practice Tips on OBC Prescriptive Energy Compliance and Modelling. He has presented his work at the OAA Festival in Quebec City and at BECOR.

 

 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

70CE

Engineered Infection Prevention - New Technologies

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Healthcare facilities in Canada have significant numbers of healthcare acquired infections (HAIs), which cost more than $4 billion, and affect over 200,000 patients at a ratio of approximately 1 in 15. The majority of these are preventable. In order to reduce the HAIs, we need to think differently. Today, the prevention and control strategies are environmental cleaning and disinfection (not adequate), antibiotic stewardship (not effective), and building design (CSA Z8000 is starting to work). The additional strategies available today are through technology and innovation. These are called Engineered Infection Prevention (EIP) technologies. Examples are ultraviolet disinfection systems (fixed and autonomous), ozonated water sinks, and copper alloy surfaces. These technologies and others can be installed in an existing facilities or even better in a new healthcare facility build.

Many people will ask this question. “What do these technologies cost?” A good financial question, but the better question would be “What do these technologies save?” The brief answer is less patient HAIs and deaths, significantly less operating costs and more beds freed up for better utilization.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand current infection reduction strategies.
    2. Learn how to implement new engineered infection prevention strategies.
    3. Understand capital costs and clinical evidence.
    4. Learn about the savings of infections, operating costs, and role of the architect.

Speaker(s)

Richard Dixon, BSc., MSM

Richard Dixon has 37 years of experience in senior administration, planning, design, construction, commissioning, and infection prevention and control for health facilities in Canada. For Canadian Standards Association, he chairs the Cleaning and Disinfection Committee (Z317.12) and the CSA Wayfinding standard (Z317.14); he is also the vice chair of the Infection Control during Construction, Renovation or Maintenance in Health Care Facilities Committee (Z317.13). Richard is also a past member of Health Care Facilities Committee (Z8000), Health Care Facilities Operations & Maintenance Committee (Z8002), Health Care Technical Committee, CSA Regulators Committee, and CSA Plumbing Committee (Z317.1). A member of the Canadian Healthcare Engineering Society (CHES), he was the education coordinator for CHES 2017 conference in Niagara Falls, and the co-founder of the non-profit organization CHAIR (Coalition Healthcare Acquired infection Reduction) Canada. 

 

 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

71CE

Accessibility Design Beyond the Building Codes

 

 

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The Ontario Government has set a goal of making the Province fully accessible to people with disabilities by 2025. And recently, the Minister for Seniors and Accessibility announced that the Government of Ontario is investing $1.3 million, over two years through a new partnership, to remove accessibility barriers in the built environment. The session will walk attendees through the Government of Ontario’s action plan and delve deeper into the barrier-free design requirements in the building codes to assess if its application alone is enough to reach the government’s ambitious goals. The session will further introduce supplementary design tools, such as the Rich Hansen Accessibility Certificate Program, that can be used to better serve clients and improve accessibility. The session will conclude with case studies and best practices that exceed/enhance the codes, as well as demonstrate how accessibility can be successfully achieved through the implementation of additional tools. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify how the Government of Ontario is taking action to remove barriers for people with disabilities.
  2. Assess the limitations of the barrier-free design requirements in the Ontario Building Code (OBC), National Building Code of Canada (NBCA), and the Integrated Accessibility Standards (IAS).
  3. Discover other barrier-free supplementary design tools, such as the Rick Hansen Accessibility Certificate Program, that can better serve the client and improve the built environment.
  4. Reinforce the notion that as designers of the built environment, it is our duty to design for the entire population, always with accessibility in mind.

 

Speakers

Stanis Smith, Architect AIBC, FRAIC, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, LTCL

Stanis Smith is Stantec’s executive vice president for innovation, an acknowledged expert in the field of airport terminal design, and the leader of Stantec’s global airport practice. A passionate advocate for universal design, he chairs the Advisory Board to the Rick Hansen Foundation. He is a frequent presenter at national and international conferences on accessibility and other topics affecting design and the practice of architecture. Examples include Harvard Graduate School of Design (Boston 2011), Universal Access (Seattle, 2012), Transed (Lisbon, 2015), Rick Hansen Foundation (Toronto 2017 and 2018), and BOMA (Newfoundland, 2019).

Elektra Vrachas, OAA, MRAIC, BCC

Elektra Vrachas is a member of the OAA and serves on its Sub-Committee on Building Codes and Regulation (SCOBCAR). She has over 25 years of architectural experience and expertise in all aspects of the design and construction industry for various building types, including extensive experience with various provincial building codes, regulations, and standards including the Ontario Fire Code and National Fire Code. Her keen understanding of the building code and current trends in the construction industry is a direct benefit to the life safety, health, fire protection, and accessibility of the building and to the client. 

 

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

72CE

Controlling Construction Vibrations in Sensitive Buildings

 

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Construction activities can induce high levels of vibration that can potentially result in damage to neighbouring structures. Additionally, for more sensitive occupancies such as hospitals and laboratory research buildings with vibration-sensitive equipment, predicting and controlling construction-induced vibration into these spaces is critical. 

This presentation will cover the testing and analysis methodologies in predicting construction-induced vibrations into structures. Construction vibration monitoring procedures and mitigation options will also be presented.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn about the effects of construction-induced vibration on neighbouring structures.
    2. Learn about vibration testing methodologies.
    3. Learn about analyses and methodologies to predict the impact of construction-induced vibrations on neighbouring structures.
    4. Learn about possible vibration control solutions.

Speaker(s)

Michael Wesolowsky, PhD, P.Eng.

As a senior member of Thornton Tomasetti’s acoustics, noise, and vibration control engineering team, Dr. Michael Wesolowsky has more than 20 years of experience in analysis, project management, and design. Mike specializes in such areas as vibration studies for architectural and structural design, dynamic data acquisition and analysis, architectural acoustic studies, and vibration control research and development. Mike joined Thornton Tomasetti in 2017 through its acquisition of Swallow Acoustic Consultants. He is also a sessional faculty member in the Bachelor of Technology Program at McMaster University.

Melissa Wong, M.Sc., P.Eng.

Melissa Wong originally joined Swallow Acoustic Consultants Ltd. (now Swallow Acoustic/Thornton Tomasetti) in June 2013 where she has been involved in a wide range of acoustic, noise, and vibration-related projects. Melissa has a master’s of science in structural engineering from the Hong Kong University of Science and Technology and an undergraduate degree in Engineering Science from the University of Toronto. Her master’s project involved utilizing smartphones to assess dynamic properties of a floor. Between 2015 and 2016, Melissa also worked as a structural designer at Fast+Epp, focusing on building design.

 

 
 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

73CE

Going All In: The Anatomy of a Start Up

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Cumulus Architects Inc. founding Principals Sheldon Catarino and Paul Szaszkiewicz will share their experience launching a new architectural firm. One part ‘how to’ and one part ‘lessons learned,’ the presentation will include review of early strategic planning, market sector research, SWOT analysis, and cash flow projections that were developed as part of the Cumulus Business Plan. This will be compared against actual growth and performance five years in.

The session will include opportunities for Q&A as well as an opportunity for others to share their experiences. It will be of interest to aspiring interns and architects curious about taking what is for most architects the biggest leap of faith in our professional lives.

As an emerging practice with five years in the Ontario market, Cumulus Architects have transitioned from a fledgling organization to a recognized partner in the industry, having dramatically increased both volume of work and number of employees. In a highly competitive market, it has been successful in continuing relationships with multiple former clients, while establishing significant new relationships with both major clients and respected leaders in the design and construction industry. 

Learning Objectives

  1.  Learn business planning fundamentals.
  2. Understand risk tolerance.
  3.  Know how to create your value proposition.
  4.  Understand how to establish a cultural foundation.

Speaker(s)

Paul Szaszkiewicz, OAA, AAA, AAPEI, MRAIC,

Paul Szaszkiewicz is an experienced design team leader and skilled management expert, having served as senior principal and director at some of Canada’s leading architectural practices. Over the past 25 years, Paul has led multi-disciplinary design teams for large and complex academic and medical centres, civic buildings, and mixed-use developments. He is the co founder and director of Cumulus Architects with Sheldon Catarino.

Sheldon Catarino, OAA, AAA, AAPEI, MRAIC, NCARB, LEED AP

Sheldon Catarino is an experienced design architect with sought-after leadership and management skills honed at practices in New York and Toronto. As a project leader, Sheldon has directed large multi-disciplinary groups where his hands-on approach focuses equally on the design and the detailing as the project execution on site. He is the co founder and director of Cumulus Architects with Paul Szaszkiewicz.

 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

74CE

A Leadership Shift: From Diversity to Inclusion

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

This leadership topic recognizes the change in how practices manage their people and shape culture. Creative businesses benefit from inclusive leadership and cultures where different perspectives and diversity of thought contribute to ideas and problem-solving. Leaders of and within architecture practices can develop inclusive leadership skills to benefit their people and practice. And, they can encourage change for the practice to become more inclusive, benefiting their people and business.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the shifted paradigm from diversity to inclusion in business and leadership.
    2. Learn the key concepts for inclusive leadership and the business benefit for inclusive practice cultures.
    3. Be introduced to inclusive leadership skills for leaders of teams and businesses.
    4. Learn a change management model for implementing diversity and inclusion initiatives in the practice.

Speaker(s)

Russell Pollard, B.Phil.(Leadership), MBA, CCLI

Russell Pollard specializes in leadership training and staff engagement. He serves as chair for the Museum of Architecture’s Associates’ Club in London, England and was commissioned by the RAIC to develop its Leadership for Architects program and deliver it across the country. He works with businesses, advising them on people, culture, marketing, and brand. Russell has a bachelor’s degree in interdisciplinary leadership and an MBA; he is pursuing a Certificate in Leadership and Inclusion.

 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

75CE

NON-BUILDING: Architecture without facade

 

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

This presentation will explore how projects do not need a facade or iconic expression to be compelling public architecture. Investigating the idea of “NON-BUILDING” at various scales and programs, the idea of architecture as experience rather than an image or built form will be presented through three public projects with three distinct programs. Through engaging design and pedagogical approaches, Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, MRAIC, RIBA, partner at Provencher_Roy, will present how abandoning the notion of facade altogether can have a transformative effect without calling on traditional notions of iconography, shifting how we see design in architectural practice. This lecture should be of particular interest to architects dealing with projects in a heritage context, with very rich campus-like or urban settings.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn how a new project (McCall MacBain House on McGill University’s downtown campus), meant to be about the transformation of education, stands out amongst all the heritage by being designed as an experience.
    2. Understand how design can be a pedagogical tool in democracy, and fundamental to the creation of a meaningful project (National Assembly) that will create common ground amongst stakeholders that have very different agendas.                                                                  3. Investigate how architects can shift the discourse surrounding a project (Alexandra Pier) and redefine its objectives so it becomes a public endeavour.                                                                                                                                                                                    4. Experience how architecture creates a consciousness of context and presence as it moves away from the desire to be an image—a comparison of architectural photography versus social media images will help understand the difference between architecture vision and architectural experience.

Speaker(s)

Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, Architect

Nicolas Demers-Stoddart joined the Provencher_Roy team in 2011 and has since played a top-tier design role. He has worked as design manager on numerous projects, including Gare Viger and the reception pavilion of the Québec National Assembly, the latter the winner of an Award of Merit at the 2016 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence. He was also involved in the design of the Iberville International Maritime Terminal and Alexandra Pier; Carré Saint-Laurent; and the 1:X exhibition. Before signing on with Provencher_Roy, Nicolas worked at OMA New York, most notably on the design of the Marina Abramovic Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art (MAI).

 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

76CE

Changing Tides: The Role of Copyright in Architecture

 

 

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Copyright in architectural works has historically been a dormant field, but recent events indicate that it’s anything but. In 1993, the Copyright Act was amended such that architectural works could more easily gain copyright protection. However, for reasons that will be explored, it was only in September 2017 that we saw the real potential of these provisions—a structural engineering firm was awarded $750,000 in damages for copyright infringement. The industry was set for another copyright-related shock when the Supreme Court of Canada concluded in 2019 that the Crown owned published plans of survey submitted to Teranet.

These cases underscore the relevance of copyright in the world of construction, and signal a shift in the legal landscape, which necessitates that architects adopt a proactive approach to the historically inactive world of copyright in architectural works. Industry players should dust off old presumptions and precedents and gain a working understanding of the Court’s current stance on copyright in the construction space. This lecture will equip architects with knowledge on how copyright intersects with the life-cycle of construction projects, keys ownership issues, licensing best practices, and defences to infringement, all the while providing practical tips that can be immediately implemented in their practice, such as how to register copyright, implement appropriate copyright notices, and critical contract provisions and reservations of rights.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand what is copyright, how it arises, and what you can do with it in your practice.
  2. Learn how to navigate the ownership and licensing issues in copyright and architectural works, and the consequence of waiving moral rights.
  3. Understand what constitutes copyright infringement, and the application of fair dealing as a defence to copyright infringement.
  4. Gain best practices in protecting and commercializing copyright in your architectural works and how to avoid pitfalls.

Speaker(s)

Christie Bates, HBA, M.Phil. (Cantab), B.C.L, LLM

Christie Bates is an associate in the Intellectual Property Group at Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP. She has a broad practice in the licensing, protection, enforcement, and acquisition of intellectual property (IP). As her practice involves both solicitor and litigation work, she can strategically advise on each stage in the lifecycle of her clients’ intellectual property assets. Christie has presented and authored several papers on the intersection of IP in non-traditional areas, such as copyright and construction.

 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

77CE

Architect and Contractor: A Methodology for Great Transit

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

How does the relationship between architect and contractor impact the delivery of great mobility projects in P3? 

In this session, the architect and the contractor for the new Eglinton Crosstown LRT in Toronto will discuss the collaborative approach—from design to construction—that led to the efficient delivery of a complex, 15-station, 19-km transit corridor, connecting to Toronto’s existing subway lines and above-ground routes. This includes a discussion on their methodology and how a unified front and a willingness to invest the time to test ideas, generate new products, and establish a system-wide approach to problem solving will lead to the seamless execution of a singular transit vision.

Learning Objectives

    1. Define the process by which architects and contractors manage large-scale transit infrastructure projects, specifically, as it relates to testing system-wide design ideas, communicating with team leads, and problem solving.
    2. Gain real-world examples of specific construction and design details that were mocked-up successfully or tested and saw a flaw that had to be resolved.
    3. Be able to recognise a composite of key areas in order to establish a methodology for detailing and sequencing.
    4. Develop a working methodology between architects and contractors that will result in an efficient construction and delivery timeline without compromising design ideals.

Speaker(s)

Lisa D’Abbondanza, B.Arch., BES, MRAIC, OAA, LEED AP

Lisa D’Abbondanza is an award-winning architect with 25 years of experience. She began her transit architecture specialization in the office of Richard Stevens where she assisted in growing the firm’s transit station portfolio. Lisa understands all facets of project delivery and has experience with the complexities of delivering high quality projects while meeting functionality, resilience, beauty, and value. Lisa has been a design architect for numerous transit projects as well as a facility manager with experience in coordinating between sub-consultants, transit agencies, AHJs, municipal officials, and public and private stakeholders. Her experience and understanding of the complexities of diverse project procurement environments enables her to partner with client and stakeholder groups alike in numerous roles and build consensus without compromising design intent or integrity. Lisa is currently acting as systemwide architectural lead for the Eglinton Crosstown LRT currently under construction.

Andrea Celovsky, B.Sc., EIT

Andrea Celovsky is a construction engineering professional who has worked on large, design-build, Canadian transit projects since 2014 with EllisDon Construction. As a lead in the procurement and project management of the Eglinton Crosstown LRT, she knows that in order to deliver a successful project on an efficient timeline, it is critical to have a strong partnerships, aligning and managing progress for construction and design milestones.

 

 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

78CE

Low-Energy Heritage Building Retrofits: Insulating Safely

 

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Low-energy building retrofits are a requirement of any plan to reach a carbon-neutral economy before 2050. Major existing building retrofits conducted now will still be in service by that time, including heritage buildings. This means high insulation and airtightness retrofits to reduce needed energy generation to meet targets. But how do you ensure you do not destroy the heritage fabric with the resulting change in heat flow through the exterior walls? What are the freeze-thaw risks?

This session will look at new techniques to analyze and model various heritage building projects now underway, and how these techniques allow for a more rigorous and fact-based approach to insulating these buildings in our cold climate. We will look at the results of two projects and tie in the impacts of the building envelope improvements on the overall thermal energy demand intensity (TEDI) performance and greenhouse gas (GHG) reductions for the facilities as part of the whole-building energy modelling also undertaken. We will also outline the building data monitoring programs that are being introduced to assess success.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand the importance of the building envelope on energy use and greenhouse gas emissions.
    2. Become aware of the new techniques for assessing heritage building envelopes for risk related to changes in energy use.
    3. Learn solutions to heritage envelope improvement learned from two example projects.
    4. Tackle the myths of allowable changes to heritage building fabrics.

Speaker(s)

David Kayll, FMA, P.Eng.

David Kayll is a senior building science specialist, project manager, and principal in Morrison Hershfield’s Ottawa office. He has over 30 years of experience in building science, building envelope performance, energy performance, and facility management on multi-disciplined architectural/engineering teams for new and renovation construction on heritage, institutional, industrial, commercial, and residential facilities. His experience includes 10 years on the East Coast, five on the West Coast, and more than 15 in the National Capital Area. David provides facility management consulting expertise on carbon-neutral studies, asset management plans, strategic accommodation strategies, and re-commissioning plans. He is a member of the National Codes Commission Standing Committee on Environmental Separation and has served on the 2015 and 2020 code cycles, and will continue into the 2025 cycle. David is registered as a professional engineer in the provinces of Ontario, Nova Scotia, and Manitoba.

 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

79CE

Beyond Utilization: The Business of Architecture

 

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The realities of operating a profitable studio necessitates open conversation beyond design excellence. Learn how a successful 150-person, 45-year-old practice broke the standard of keeping the business of architecture siloed and behind closed doors. Move beyond utilization rates as the measure of success by empowering project accountants, project managers, and studio staff to leverage the power of a more accessible and intuitive ERP software. The results have led to increased transparency, improved client relations, and a highly effective approach to operations that increases profitability, allowing resources to be invested in technology, learning, and advancing the practice.

Architectural practices are businesses. Through an open, honest look at the least-talked about parts of our profession, learn how our practice model increased the ability to provide a better, more inclusive staff experience by putting successful business strategies, and business management, at the forefront of a practice. Attendees will learn to challenge the limitations of operational software, ensuring they best serve their studio’s needs and understand how to implement the competitive advantages gained by educating staff on fees, billing, and operational standards. A practice where everyone is invested in efficiency and operations, but not pressured by harsh expectation, is one that thrives. 

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand how a new practice model can increase the ability to provide a better, more inclusive staff experience by putting successful business strategies at the forefront of your practice.
    2. Learn to challenge the limitations of operational software, ensuring they best serve their studio’s needs
    3. Appreciate how to leverage a competitive advantage by educating staff on fees, billing, and operational standards.
    4. Leave with the understanding that internal and external silos need to broken and a practice where everyone is invested in efficiency and operations, but not pressured by harsh expectation, is one that thrives.

Speaker(s)

Ellen Bensky, BA, Dip.Arch.Tech. (Hon), CanBIM P1

Ellen Bensky contributes on a daily basis to the advancement of architectural technology and virtual design not only in her firm, but also industry-wide through her initiatives and dedication. Passionate for education, Ellen is especially proud of spearheading an internal academy that provides a comprehensive learning and teaching platform for the firm. Through her current role, Ellen is able to engage daily in the process of successfully leveraging business needs and architectural realities, driving her quest for operational excellence. An experienced speaker, she has presented at local and international at colleges and universities, as well as industry events including KA Connect 2018 and 2019, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s (RAIC’s) 2018 conference, and BiLT Australia/New Zealand 2019. She has several engagements scheduled in Canada, the United States, and Europe for the remainder of the year. Ellen is the proud recipient of the CanBIM 2017 Professional Achievement Award.

Steve Nonis, B.Arch., OAA, AANB, AAPEI, MRAIC, CanBIM P3, LEED AP

A partner at Turner Fleischer, Steve Nonis is driven to achieve the optimal connection between technology and design. At the forefront of the firm’s BIM initiatives, he was instrumental in TF’s pioneering efforts to apply 3D design processes. Passionate for sharing knowledge, Steve has spoken as part of Autodesk University, at local and international education institutions, and recently at the RAIC’s 2018 Festival.

 

 
 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

80CE

What’s New with CCDC 2?

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

With the publication of the 2020 version of the CCDC 2, Stipulated Price Contract, just around the corner, this session will give you a head start on what’s to come. Presented by some of the industry experts who helped to create this consensus-based document, attendees will learn about the changes from the previous edition. This includes the introduction of the new Ready-for-Takeover milestone, which will trigger the handover of warranty, care, custody, and control of the work. Other important changes that will be addressed include new provisions addressing early occupancy by the owner and the relocation of some clauses to the new CCDC Master Specification for Division 01. This session will also cover the implications of Ontario’s Construction Act with the new CCDC 2.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn about the new ‘Ready-for-Takeover’ milestone.
    2. Understand why certain clauses of CCDC 2 have been moved to the Division 01 specification.
    3. Learn about the other changes made to the new CCDC 2.
    4. Understand the implications of the Ontario Construction Act with the use of the new CCDC 2.

Speaker(s)

Bruce Cleaver, Managing Director

Walter Strachan, VP, Risk Management 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

81CE

Reviving Historic Masonry from the Inside: A Case Study

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Numerous historic load-bearing masonry buildings exist across Canada, all of which are consuming massive amounts of energy to maintain occupant comfort, especially in the winter. Understanding how to safely upgrade these types of buildings, without endangering the historic value of the construction, is a much-needed skill for designers, architects, and engineers. In this case study presentation, a historic load-bearing masonry residence in a temperate climate is retrofitted into a low-energy home without compromising the look of the existing facade or adversely affecting the long-term durability of the existing building.

The Gemini House project, a collaboration of the University of Toronto and ERA Architects, is both a reference and an inspiration to designers who wish to develop safe, durable, low-energy retrofit solutions for historic-designated projects. This session presents the detailing of the enclosure, pushing the boundaries of conventional construction, and even conventional ways of occupying a house. With the right detailing methods, the concerns of historic preservation, upfront expense, and potential for professional risk can be reduced or, in some cases, eliminated. The uncertainty around each of these perceived “road blocks” is eliminated when designers educate themselves in best practices using case studies such as this one. 

Learning Objectives

    1. Witness enclosure detailing for low-energy, durable historic building retrofits, with opportunities to ask questions and debate alternate solutions.
    2. Be introduced to the Nested Thermal Envelope Design (NTED) concept for low-energy retrofits—a new way of dividing spaces into thermal comfort zones based on room use and proximity to the envelope.
    3. Understand the effects of historic construction, current code standards, and low-energy retrofits on energy use by exposure to data from the case study.
    4. Understand issues of procurement, testing, constructability, and mocks up required to engage in deep low-energy retrofits, as shared by the architect who oversaw the construction phase of the project.

Speaker(s)

Andrea Atkins, M.Arch., M.Eng., LEED AP

Andrea Atkins is a lecturer in architectural engineering at the University of Waterloo, and teaches structural courses at the University of Waterloo School of Architecture. Previously, she was a structural designer at Blackwell Structural Engineers in Toronto. She obtained her master’s of architecture at the University of Waterloo in 2013 and her master’s of engineering at the University of Toronto in 2018. Andrea has guest-lectured in building science capstone courses and provided technical advice for graduate architecture students at the University of Toronto. Her interests span across design and technical disciplines, including architecture, building science, structural design, and sustainability.

Graeme Stewart, OAA, MRAIC, CIP, RPP, CAHP

Graeme Stewart is a Toronto-based architect and urban planner and principal with ERA Architects, where he has contributed to many of the Toronto region’s leading urban design, cultural planning, and revitalization projects. Graeme is a founding director of the Centre for Urban Growth and Renewal (CUG+R), an interdisciplinary urban research organization supporting policy and action toward more equitable and resilient urban regions. The key focus of CUG+R is Tower Renewal, an initiative focused on the low-carbon future of mid-century tower blocks found throughout urban Canada. Graeme is the co-editor of Concrete Toronto: A Guidebook to Concrete Architecture from the Fifties to the Seventies, and in 2014 was recipient of the Jane Jacobs Prize for his ongoing Tower Renewal research and design work.

 

 
 
 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

82 CE

Bird-Friendly Design

 

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

In recent years, there has been an increase in glass used in a wide range of built environment uses: floor-to-ceiling windows, glass railing and balconies, bus shelters, amongst others. Unfortunately, as the use of glass increases, so does bird collision. According to the Fatal Light Awareness Program (FLAP), 100 million to one billion migrating birds die every year in North America due to building collisions. Making informed decisions early on, even at the schematic design phase, can have a significant impact in mitigating the negative effects that buildings have on wildlife.

Bird-friendly design is now mandatory in the Site Plan Application process of multiple Ontario municipalities. However, there are still misconceptions and design decisions being made that have a negative impact. During this session, we will break down how architecture is affecting the bird population and what we can do to mitigate it.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn the key elements for bird-friendly design and how early involvement in decision making can help.
    2. Understand the implications of glass markings both on the interior and the exterior of the building, as well as other bird-friendly architectural elements.
    3. Learn the standards and regulations including the CSA A460:19 standard for bird-friendly design and LEED pilot credit 55 Bird Collision Deterrence.
    4. Learn about future technologies and risk assessment.

Speaker(s)

Mauro Carre, Arq., M.Arch., OAA, MRAIC, LEED AP BD+C

Mauro Carre is a licensed architect in Canada and Mexico, and a LEED Accredited Professional with a strong interest in sustainable architecture, building materials, and construction. He has extensive experience in all stages of design, construction documents, management, coordination, and contract administration for multiple building typologies and scales, including residential, academic, and institutional. He has a deep understanding of how design impacts the natural environment and acted as a consultant to the City of Toronto on developing bird-friendly guidelines and policies. Mauro also shares his expertise through teaching and has a long history of engaging with the academic community, currently as a guest lecturer at Ryerson University and with past experience as a professor at the Universidad Iberoamericana and as a seasonal lecturer at the University of Toronto’s John H. Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape, and Design.

Michael Mesure, BA

Michael Mesure is the co-founder and executive director of FLAP Canada. Almost three decades ago, he started the bird-building collision movement after having a profound encounter with a yellowthroat he rescued from a building collision. Shortly thereafter, in 1993, he co-founded, alongside a team of like-minded people, FLAP Canada. Today, Michael continues to be an active member of FLAP and leads a series of educational initiatives to safeguard migratory birds in the built environment, support policy development, research, rescue, and rehabilitation.

 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

83CE

Optimizing Retrofit Design for Elite Performance

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Achieving certification to Zero Carbon Building Standard or Passive House can seem like a daunting task, particularly on a retrofit project. The relative impact of thermal bridging and envelope transitions is amplified in low-energy buildings and particularly challenging to resolve in retrofit conditions. Humber College’s Deep Energy Retrofit Project for the Nx Building surmounted these challenges through careful integration across architectural design, energy modelling, envelope design, and mechanical design. Construction phase challenges were also met by implementing a robust testing protocol to facilitate EnerPhit and Zero Carbon Building certification. Retrofits are able to meet or exceed new building performance standards, illustrating that existing building stock can be an important aspect of reducing overall greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions due to the building industry.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand what makes Passive House and Zero Carbon Building Standard certifications ideal for application at an institution and the challenges to be addressed to plan retrofit projects in particular.
    2. Evaluate possible energy conservation measures (ECMs) to identify the optimal package to suit a renovation project, with specific considerations and challenges involved in planning and delivering a high-performance.
    3. Put design concepts into construction practice and learn the challenges to be navigated to ensure intended building envelop performance via robust testing procedures.
    4. Find synergies across certifications with incremental improvements, looking at your high-performance project through a different lens, and understanding resultant load profiles.

Speaker(s)

Holly Jordan, B.Arch. Eng., M.Arch., OAA, EIT, LEED AP BD+C, MRAIC

Holly Jordan joined B+H in 2011 and has more than a decade of experience with commercial, institutional, and residential projects in Canada and the United States. Drawing on her professional degrees in both engineering and architecture, she is committed to finding innovative, sustainable approaches to all stages of design from early conceptual development through to final detail solutions. Her roles have included conceptual design development, site and environmental analysis, project management, consultant coordination, contract administration, and authority submissions. Building on her contributions to sustainable design, Holly served two terms on the Canada Green Building Council (CaGBC) Greater Toronto Chapter Board of Directors and continues on its Toronto-based Advocacy Committee. Her recent projects include the Humber College Building Nx, and H Deep Energy Retrofit Project, Manulife Centre Renovation, and Macdonald Block Redevelopment Project.

Steve Murray, P.Eng., PMP

Steve Murray has broad professional experience in condition assessment, investigation of building envelope failures, rehabilitation design, structural repair, construction documentation, contract administration, and facilities management planning. He has investigated, designed, and overseen repairs to dozens of buildings, involving roofing, cladding, masonry, curtain wall, EIFS, and windows. More recently, Steve has been active in providing architect and developer clients with envelope design assistance, design review, and energy optimization advice.

Rui Raposo, M.Arch., LEED Green Associate, PMP

Rui Raposo, project manager with Humber College, is an architect with expertise in building science. Rui is LEED Green Associate certified and holds a master’s degree from IST-Portugal in architecture. His research was based on retrofitting houses to more energy-efficient buildings, with special attention on operational and embodied carbon. He has over 12 years of practical experience with architecture in Canada, Portugal, and Brazil, working in vast programmatic areas as educational and commercial buildings, project management, and facilities management. Rui is currently focused on developing awareness on embodied carbon calculations for new and existing buildings going through renovations, and one of his goals is to turn Humber College into one of the most energy-efficient educational campuses in Canada with its Integrated Energy Master Plan (IEMP).

Alejandro Ortega, P.Eng.

Alejandro Ortega is a senior mechanical engineer at Morrison Hershfield. He has over 15 years of experience designing and evaluating mechanical systems for data centres, laboratories, central utilities plants, institutional facilities, transportation facilities, and hydro-power plants. His experience spans the entire gamut of engineering services, starting with master planning, pre-feasibility and feasibility studies through to detailed design, contract administration, and start-up and commissioning. Alejandro has been instrumental in implementing strategic building systems solutions to complement key building envelope improvement projects.

 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

84CE

Laneway Suites: Toronto’s New Housing Typology

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Presented by Craig Race of Lanescape, the originators of Toronto’s new laneway suite bylaws, this session dives into the history, planning rationale, zoning bylaws, and designs of as-of-right laneway suites. Seventy-five per cent of Toronto’s land area has diminishing populations thanks to antiquated and oppressive zoning, and homeowners are experiencing unprecedented financial pressure in buying and maintaining their homes. Laneway suites are the first of many progressive housing typologies that seek to “unlock the yellow belt” and expand housing diversity in the neighbourhoods that need it most.

Learning Objectives

    1. Understand history of laneway housing in North America.
    2. Understand how architects created and lobbied for the new zoning bylaws.
    3. Understand the practical and theoretical limitations and possibilities of zoning and construction for laneway houses.
    4. Understand housing market and planning influences on Toronto and its new and forthcoming housing typologies.

Speaker(s)

Craig Race, OAA, LEED AP, CanPHI Passive House Planner

Craig Race and his colleagues Andrew and Alex formed Lanescape in 2014 with the specific purpose of advocating for an as-of-right laneway housing bylaws in Toronto. Their advocacy focused on making laneway units non-severable, with services from the main house, and subject to a simple and affordable approvals process. This type of housing was intended to benefit individual homeowners who require increasingly creative ways to afford their mortgages, and renters who have limited options in low-rise neighbourhoods. In addition to his role at Lanescape, Craig operates an architecture and development practice focused on environmentally conscious, contextually sensitive residential design.

 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

85CE

Making the Magic Happen with Alternative Solutions

 

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours 
1.5 AIA CES LU

Mass timber buildings have experienced a spike in popularity among designers and developers. The interest is driven by the move to more sustainable building practices and potential for panelized construction. Other drivers to wood are site-specific challenges such as building weight and site access. This presentation discusses a series of projects including 77 Wade Avenue in Toronto (eight-storey mass timber and steel high-bred building), V6 by R Hauz, (six-storey CLT building), and Toronto Regional Conservation Authority (TRCA’s) new headquarters (four-storey mass timber)—all of which have their challenges and design solutions.

Learning Objectives

    1. Learn about mass timber.
    2. Understand the building code implications.
    3. Learn about alternative solutions.
    4. Gain knowledge from case studies.

Speaker(s)

Jack Keays, P.Eng.

Jack is an accomplished building code consultant with project experience in Canada, Singapore, and Middle East. Jack has been active in the industry for 12 years and has been the principal engineer for many of the tall mass timber buildings in Canada, including the 77 Wade Avenue and T3 Bayside.

 

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

86CE

Lighting for Circadian Health: It’s All About Communication!

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Lighting for circadian health is a topic of interest for designers, architects, and health-care providers as light—both natural and electric—plays an important role in regulating our sleep/wake cycle. Sleep quality has a direct impact on our physical and mental health. Over the past two decades, we have been exploring the impact of light on sleep quality and it has become apparent that it is time for a paradigm shift in the way we design and specify products. 

Open communication and collaboration are more critical than ever before, especially in our northern climate, as we now understand that the quality and exposure to light during the day is just as important as the quality and exposure to light at night.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand light as a phenomenon as well as the anatomy of the eye and portions of the brain responsible for both visual and non-visual (circadian) response.
  2. Realize why lighting designers and light source manufacturers are the ultimate illusionists and how traditional electric lighting compromises our ability to sustain circadian entrainment.
  3. Gain a better appreciation for the importance of darkness and sleep.
  4. Gather ideas for design to achieve optimal results in terms of health, sustainability, and economy.

Speaker

Dawn Brown, Associate IALD, CLD

Dawn Brown has over 15 years of experience as a lighting designer. She is a Dean’s Honours graduate of Mohawk College’s Architectural Technology diploma program and Ryerson’s Lighting Design Certificate program. She is an associate member of the International Association of Lighting Designers (IALD), Lighting Certified under the National Qualifications for Lighting Professionals, and a member of the Toronto Chapter of the Illuminating Engineering Society. Throughout her career, she has completed projects in various sectors including health-care, commercial and office buildings, civic, correctional, transportation and roadway, and residential. Her motivation for presenting this topic stems from her philosophy on lighting design in that it takes a village as the best designs are always the result of a collaborated effort. Her objective is to raise awareness about the impact of light on our body, with the hope of making it a little easier to design healthy indoor spaces for people.

9:00 AM - 11:30 AM

11T

The Future of Bloor Street West Tour

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

This walking tour will explore the stretch of Bloor Street between Spadina Avenue and Dundas Street West. We will not only review current development applications, but also hear from community members, BIAs, and community initiatives. Bloor Street West has not seen the intense level of development that we would expect on a rapid transit corridor—yet. But with new policies and increasing demand, we are now starting to see more development activity, including some at a very large scale.

Highlights include meeting the architect/developer for a few of the following developments: 300 Bloor St W, Mirvish Village, Bloor Dufferin, and Bloor Dundas West; we will also meet with community groups such as Building better Bloor Dufferin, Bloor Annex BIA, and BIG on Bloor. Highlights include exploration of the Bloor-Dufferin site, mid-rise buildings, and the new transit hub at Dundas West.

This tour has substantial walking.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

12T

60 Richmond Housing Co-op Tour

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

This is a tour of the Governor General Award-winning 60 Richmond Housing Co-op. It will include a tour of the interior, including the sixth-floor courtyard. 60 Richmond East is the first new housing co-operative to be built in Toronto in almost 20 years. This project sets an example for urban infill and for sustainability in residential construction. Located near a busy Toronto downtown intersection, this 11-storey LEED Gold building seeks to provide an alternative to the local ubiquitous glass tower condominium projects. The massing of the building is imagined as a solid street wall that is then carved into in order to create openings and terraces at various levels. These terraces become the social spaces of the building as well as gardens. This project explores ideas of contemporary urbanism and seeks to understand and express the notion that urban form can simultaneously be environmentally friendly.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

 

 

9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

13T

New Meets Old - U of T St George Campus

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

With more than 150 years of architectural history, the University of Toronto’s St. George campus is without a doubt one of the most unique and remarkable architectural collections in Canada.  Home to over 80 heritage-designated buildings, this historical campus though is far from a museum. With just over 90,000 students, as well as thousands of faculty and staff, the University is a city that is continuously growing and evolving—requiring new buildings, retrofits, and renovations to keep up with its changing population.

This walking tour explores how architects have worked around, added to, repaired, adapted, and sometimes even relocated some of the university’s earliest structures. Learn about the unique challenges and opportunities that arise when dealing with heritage structures. Highlights in this tour include the Royal Ontario Museum, the Royal Conservatory of Music, Robarts Library, and One Spadina Crescent. 

This tour has significant walking.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

 

 

2:00 PM - 5:00 PM

14T

RC Harris Water Treatment Plant Tour

3 Unstructured Learning Hours

Built in the 1930s, the R.C. Harris Water Treatment Plant is Toronto's largest water treatment plant. It is also the largest collection of Art Deco buildings in the city, often referred to as "The Palace of Purification." The plant is internationally recognized as a technical and architectural achievement.

Attendees will see some of the results of Toronto’s Cultural Renaissance. The tour will focus on building conservation, the environmental context for the project (including the site and building), and the significance of water in the public imagination and city-building. The building conservation activity will focus on selected architectural works, research and development, conservation, and logistical issues. The talk will include comment on the positive impact of urgent social and environmental challenge on conservation practice, and the increasing role of activism to address these issues. You will need to sign a waiver for this tour.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

 

2:15 PM - 4:45 PM

15T

Art & Performance Tour (TSA)

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

This two-hour walking tour will explore the story of Toronto’s vibrant cultural scene through its architecture and landscapes. Along the way, you will learn about the origins of the world’s third-largest English-speaking theatre district and visit the epicentre of one of the largest international film festivals in the world. Our tour will end with a stop at OCAD—Canada’s oldest and largest educational institution for art and design—and the Art Gallery of Ontario (AGO), which is home to the largest collection of Canadian art in the world.

Highlights include TIFF Bell Lightbox, Sharp Centre at the Ontario College of Art & Design University, and the AGO. This tour has substantial walking.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

2:30 PM - 4:30 PM

16T

Harbour Cruise of Toronto

This tour is not eligible for ConEd Learning hours.

During this one-hour boat cruise, you will enjoy the scenic Toronto skyline and get a close-up look at the beautiful Toronto Islands and waterfront. Enjoy entertaining and informative narration live from a professional captain. It’s the best way to see Toronto from the water!

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

12:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Recognition Lunch

The celebrations continues on Friday, May 29 at the Recognition Lunch where the OAAAS will present its student award winners.

The OAA will recognize its newly licensed architects and Licensed Technologists OAA.

4:00 PM - 6:00 PM

Plenary Session

 Performance Anxiety - Understanding Energy in Architecture

Architecture represents 40% of global greenhouse gas emissions. Any strategy for a stable climate must include zero carbon architecture. But what is zero carbon architecture, actually? Canadian architects, through the OAA's recent awards submissions have proven that zero operational carbon buildings are possible even in our extreme climates, and while many of us have been designing green buildings for decades, many of us are surprised to learn that we may not know as much as we thought.
 
This year's Awards of Excellence submissions required mandatory Energy Use Intensity (EUI) reporting for the first time, and while reporting on this is often something consultants produce for us - we need to recognize as architects, it is the early design decisions that have the largest possibilities for reducing overall energy loads.  Architecture itself can do most of the heavy lifting in zero carbon design.  Understanding the principles and the EUI tools that can assist in the integration of passive design strategies, and how to integrate them into our practices and design processes, is essential to working towards climate stability. 
 
Here we'll debrief the EUI submission requirements that was explored by the architects that submitted, and the tools and design strategies they discovered to design, optimize, predict and verify their performance. We will look at how different tools can be used on small, medium and large scale projects.  Case studies will be explored and we will close the afternoon with the Official launch of the next Shift Challenge.



7:00 pm - 11:00 pm

OAA HQ Renew + Refresh opening

After the OAA Conference everyone deserves/needs a little R+R. Come to the OAA at 111 Moatfield Drive to celebrate the grand opening of the Renewed + Refreshed Headquarters. It’s the embodiment of a paradigm shift—come and experience your Association. You are the necessary component/element/ that makes the Association’s building an energized, contemporary space that reflects the best of the profession. Come and be a part of it.