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OAA Annual Conference 2020

Thursday May 28 2020 - Beanfield Centre and Hotel X, Toronto

OAA Conference 2012

Conference Program



Thursday May 28 2020

Registration: 7:30 AM – 6:00 PM
Continental Breakfast: 7:30 AM - 8:30 AM
Refreshment Breaks:
10:00 AM - 10:30 AM
3:30 PM - 4:00 PM
Sponsor Displays: 7:30 AM – 4:00 PM
8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

05AC

The Building Code Act and the Building Permit Application Process

The audience will learn about the Building Code Act legislation, the fundamentals of the building permit application process, the role of municipal officials, and what those officials expect from architects.

Learning Objectives 

  1. To describe the purpose, scope, and key content of the Building Code Act.
  2. To appreciate the fundamental obligations of the architect and municipal building officials in the permit application process and in the general review of construction.
  3. To identify key strategies for successfully navigating the building permit process.
  4. To describe mechanisms for resolving disputes about design compliance.


Speaker(s)

Mike Seiling, CET, CBCO

Mike Seiling is the director of Building & Chief Building Official (CBO) for the City of Kitchener and a past-president of the Ontario Building Officials Association (OBOA). As Director of Building/CBO for the City of Kitchener, he is responsible for the administration and enforcement of the Building Code. He has 31 years of construction experience in both the private and public sectors, including 26 years with the City of Kitchener Building Division and five years in the private sector. Mike is a graduate of Conestoga College in the Construction Engineering Technical Program and is a Certified Building Code Official with the OBOA. He is a Certified Engineering Technologist with the Ontario Association of Certified Engineering Technicians and Technologists (OACETT). Given Mike’s extensive expertise, he is often asked to advise on both technical and practical issues.

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

06AC

Ontario Building Code Compliance Data: Concepts and Code Analysis

The Ontario Building Code is a set of minimum provisions respecting the safety of buildings with reference to public health, fire protection, accessibility, and structural sufficiency.

Learning Objectives

  1. Introduction to: Regulation 27, Ontario Architects Act- Regulation 27 Subsection 49.11.  Standards of Practice - Code Compliance Data.
  2. To understand the framework of the Ontario Building Code.
  3. Understand how to navigate through the code.
  4. Review building code concepts.
  5. Code compliance data: With an example of a new building regulated under Part 3 of the Building Code and the framework of a Building Code Matrix, document a Building Code Analysis.
  6. Review some of the relevant available information provided by the OAA, through Practice Tips and Regulatory Notices.


Speaker(s)

Deborah Levine Farrow, Architect, OAA, FRAIC

James Farrow, Architect, OAA, FRAIC

 

8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

21CE

Small Firm Management Boot Camp: Business Planning & Beyond

6.0 ConEd Learning Hours
6.0 AIA CES LU

Managing a growing design firm offers a variety of unique challenges and opportunities. An unpredictable business environment and quickening pace of change requires firm owners to adapt, but how can firm owners proactively prepare for growth in uncertain times? This session demystifies the “what, why, and how” of business planning within an environment of unpredictability.

We will start with an overview of basic business plan components, where to begin, and the importance of connecting purpose, finance, marketing, and operations. We will also discuss how to develop your firm values, vision, and mission in the context of effective business planning. Next, we will dive deeper into what’s included in specific elements of financial planning, operations, organizational design, marketing strategy, and business development. As an interactive learning session, we will lead attendees through a series of exercises to help them develop their customized business plan outline. Attendees will explore components of their businesses that they may never have realized were interrelated, and they will learn how to view their firm from a “whole systems” perspective. In addition to a fresh outlook on managing their design business, attendees will leave with an outline that gives valuable structure to future planning efforts.

Learning Objectives

  1. Build skills in firm development through increased understanding of management theory and its application to small design firm practice. Through case studies in emerging practice models, attendees will be introduced to expanded possibilities for managing and growing their small firms.
  2. Explore basic business plan components including the interconnection between purpose, finance, marketing, and operations. Interactive exercises will result in each attendee creating their own customized business plan outline.
  3. Learn new ways to increase profitability through a deep dive into financial analysis, including understanding financial terminology and basic reports, budget development, key financial indicators, and how to use financial scenario planning.
  4. Learn how to develop an actionable marketing strategy and related business development program to help meet financial goals.


Speaker(s)

Rena M. Klein, FAIA

Rena M. Klein is a nationally recognized expert in small firm practice and author of The Architect’s Guide to Small Firm Management (Wiley, 2010). With 20 years of experience as the owner of a small architecture firm, and over 10 years as a consultant and educator, Rena brings a special understanding of design firms managed by entrepreneurial architects. Rena served as executive editor of AIA’s The Architect’s Handbook of Professional Practice, 15th edition (Wiley 2013) and is past-chair of the National Advisory Group for the AIA Practice Management Knowledge Community.

Emily Hall, MBA

Emily Hall brings over 18 years of architectural marketing experience to CVG, with a focus on discovering a firm’s authentic personality and using it to drive strategy. She served for over six years as senior associate and director of marketing and new business development at Union Studio Architecture & Community Design and for nine years at Durkee, Brown, Viveiros & Werenfels Architects—both architectural firms in Providence, Rhode Island that have experienced significant growth. She received an MBA from the University of Rhode Island, a master of industrial design from Rhode Island School of Design, and a BA from Colorado College.

Todd L. Reding, MBA

Todd Reding heads the CVG organization, coaching small-firm architect principals and staff on leadership development and best management practices. While serving as the vice president for alumni and development at Grinnell College, he earned an MBA from Northwestern University’s Kellogg School of Management. He was named president and CEO of ASI Signage Innovations in 2008, and, in 2011, he was among the first employees of the software startup, FunnelWise. Todd is also an adjunct lecturer on entrepreneurialism at the University of Iowa and chair of the board of trustees of Grinnell Regional Medical Center.

 

8:30 AM - 5:30 PM

22CE

High Performance @ Market Rate: IPD, Passivhaus, LEAN, & BIM

6.0 ConEd Learning Hours
6.0 AIA CES LU

For many teams, it is an almost impossible challenge to simultaneously deliver high-performance, cost-efficient buildings while maintaining high customer satisfaction and profitability. It is not uncommon for high-performance commercial buildings to cost 10 to 20 per cent more to build than conventional buildings. Adam Cohen of Passiv Science has been designing and building Passive House Commercial Buildings at costs comparable to typical new construction and is achieving Passive House level results. 

This class will discuss the basics of Integrated Project Delivery (IPD), Passive House design principles, LEAN construction, work flows specific to IPD, BIM integration, and in-depth instruction in the design/estimating integration needed for a successful project. Specific tools and methods will be taught that cover the design/cost evolution process from initial cost validation to design/cost advancement through real-time cost management during construction. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the similarities and differences between Standard Project Delivery (SPD) and Integrated Project Delivery (IPD).
  2. Understand how and why cost-neutral high-performance design (vs standard code performance) is achievable with IPD.
  3. Understand the IPD workflow between design and construction.
  4. Understand why holistic building performance analysis is critical in the cost/performance balance.


Speaker(s)

Adam Cohen, Registered Architect (ON, NZ, VA, NC, VT, NH, MD, CO) CPHC, LEED AP

Adam Cohen is a leading North American Passivhaus practitioner whose innovative work on market rate delivery of commercial high-performance building has made his expertise sought-after for projects across North America. His work’s impact has recently been recognized with the award of the Edmund Hillary Fellowship as a Global Impact Entrepreneur. As a recognized North American leader in both the Passivhaus and Integrated Project Delivery movements, Adam has presented technical papers at both national and international conferences. His work includes the first North American Passivhaus certified public school, university student centre, religious assembly building, and large project (college dormitory), as well as the world’s first Passivhaus dental clinic and commercial kitchen. He invented the Build SMART Passiv Component construction system.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

23CE

Buying/Selling or Merging an Architectural Practice

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

Most principals in architectural firms in Ontario have not planned for succession, and some have found themselves in the situation of wanting to retire and unable to take the steps necessary to sell their firms. There are also younger practitioners who would like to be in an ownership capacity and are unable to do this with their current employer. There are also smaller firms that would benefit from merging with another practice to enhance their strengths.

This session will focus on the critical elements that both buyers and sellers should be aware of if they are undertaking a sale or purchase. It will provide participants with the key issues that are to be considered should they wish to conduct a successful sale, purchase or merger.

Learning Objectives

  1. Know what are the major areas of expertise that should be retained in an acquisition/disposition or merger.
  2. Understand the basic areas that must be considered under each of the major areas of expertise in order to carry out a successful acquisition/disposition or merger.
  3. Learn how to prepare practices if you are considering a sale, what to be on the lookout if you are considering a purchase, and the challenges of carrying out a successful merger.
  4. Learn how to look at your firm as an asset and, if considering a sale, know what steps should be taken to improve its value or, if considering a purchase, learn what is worth paying for.


Speaker(s)

Eliseo Temprano, M.Arch., PP. OAA, FRAIC

Eliseo Temprano has been a practising architect in the Ottawa area for the past 35 years. As founder and principal architect of Temprano & Young Architects Inc., he has an extensive knowledge of feasibility studies, master planning, project management, and the design of institutional, commercial, heritage, and residential projects in the Ottawa area. Graduated with an M.Arch. from the University of Manitoba in 1979, Eliseo has also been actively involved in international, national, provincial, and local architectural associations in leadership roles. He is a member of the Ontario Association of Architects and a Past President (1992).

Cynthia Runolfson

Cynthia Runolfson is the president of Runolfson Kehoe & Haché. She provides forensic and investigative knowledge to entities in the public and private sectors and valuation advice regarding the fair market value of business assets for tax and estate planning, shareholder and partnership disputes, and other purposes. Cynthia formulates reports and analyses addressing division of family property, income for child and spousal support, net worth analysis, income replacement benefits, losses due to personal injury and business interruption, and breach of contract.

Andrew D. Godfrey, LLB

With 13 years of high-level corporate/commercial law experience in mergers and acquisitions, capital markets, banking, and finance, combined with a robust healthcare practice, Andrew Godfrey has overseen and run large, complex transactions for a top-tier, global law firm as well as a top-tier regional firm. He takes a demonstrated interest in the business operations of clients, with a focus on delivering superior, efficient, and timely legal results, identifying and managing risk, and facilitating strategic goals. A natural team leader and mentor, he is known for his ability to identify new business opportunities and build new client relationships in the market. Andrew is a member of the Bar in Ontario, Nova Scotia, and Prince Edward Island.

J.P. Zubec, Partner Kelly Santini LLP

An experienced litigator and labour and employment law advisor, J.P. helps clients avoid, resolve and successfully litigate disputes that combine complex conflict with high financial stakes.  His clients include employers and business owners, as well as sports associations and individuals involved in conflict over estates.  JP works closely with his clients to identify and understand the motivations and sensitivities of the parties involved and strives to find innovative and timely solutions that allow his clients to resolve or litigate their dispute quickly and effectively. J.P. has a successful track record, appearing before the Federal Court of Appeal, the Federal Court of Canada, the Divisional Court, the Superior Court of Justice, the Canada Industrial Relations Board, Ontario Labour Relations Board, the Ministry of Labour, the Human Rights Tribunal of Ontario as well as grievance and private arbitrators.


 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

24CE

Housing Affordability in Growing Urban Areas

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

The OAA’s Housing Affordability Task Group (HATG) explored design and regulatory opportunities that address housing affordability across Ontario and beyond. In particular, it was concerned with building types and changes to built form that result in responsible and cost-efficient urban intensification construction methods. HATG assessed the impact of construction costs and regulatory issues (such as zoning and building codes) on housing affordability. It explored historic, already-built, proposed, and potential case studies across a variety of scales, models, and locations in order to identify and assess emerging new approaches to housing affordability. The Task Group also explored financial solutions that could have an impact on affordability.

Learning Objectives

  1. Increase knowledge of not just “affordable housing” but also the factors affected housing affordability.
  2. Improve access to literature, case studies, and best practices for improving housing affordability.
  3. Introduce new approaches of increasing housing affordability in both Southern and Northern Ontario.
  4. Share information and ideas with other members engaged in increasing housing affordability across Ontario.


Speaker(s)

John van Nostrand, B.Arch., OAA, FRAIC, FCIP

As the lead on the SvN’s team working with the HATG, John van Nostrand has served as partner-in-charge in many of the firm’s housing projects over the last 40 years, the majority of them being for lower- and middle-income households in Canada, Africa, Latin America and Asia. He has worked the planning, design and construction of over 10,000 housing units in Canada and 30,000 overseas. John has written and lectured extensively on housing affordability issues in Canada and around the world, and has introduced new approaches to housing affordability in both developed and developing cities.

Alex Bozikovic

Alex Bozikovic is The Globe and Mail’s architecture critic. He is the co-author of Toronto Architecture: A City Guide (2017) and co-editor of House Divided (2019) He won the RAIC President’s Award for Media in Architecture in 2019. He has won a National Magazine Award and has also written for design publications such as Azure, Blueprint and Spacing.

Adrienne Pacini, MDes, APF

Adrienne Pacini is an award-winning urbanist, strategist, and social systems designer exploring Canada’s housing futures through human-centred design, systems thinking, and strategic foresight. As a principal at SHS Consulting, she is currently leading a series of federally funded Solutions Labs to tackle some of the country’s most complex housing challenges with non-profit, public, and private-sector clients.

Rachael Kelebay, Architect, OAA

Rachael Kelebay is an architect, builder, and landlord. Over several decades, she and her family assembled small and medium residential and commercial properties in several Main Street Toronto locations for future redevelopment. This involved renovating or repurposing them to fund carrying costs and subsequent purchases. They also built and operated three restaurants and a gourmet food store in some of their commercial buildings to generate cash flow. This included acquisition, financing, approvals and permits, and project and construction management. Ongoing operation involves property management, and commercial and residential rental tenancy management.

Rachael has served on boards of BIA business groups and a medium-sized hospital’s building and finance committees.


Peter Turner, OAA, AANB, AAPEI, NSAA, AAA, Architect AIBC, FRAIC, RPP, OPPI

Peter Turner is principal of Turner Fleischer Architects Inc., which he founded 46 years ago. His focus is on urban design and approvals for residential projects. His wide range of completed affordable housing projects have addressed many funding methods and built form challenges with innovation in revitalization, infill, and green fields. He participated in the recent OAA Housing Affordability Task Group and sits on two design review panels in the GTA.

 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

25CE

Architecture, Social Justice, and Public Space

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

How do we build social justice? In this presentation, workshop, and discussion, we will analyze the historiography of space and place and the pedagogies and practices that have been used to train architects over the past century. 

By looking very carefully at how architects have been trained to think using a very particular set of modern masters and reductionist methods, a specific way of making places and imagining space has been ingrained into the architectural imagination that is now being called into question. While great achievements have been made demographically to diversify the field of architecture, the profession remains ossified in its relationality to race, class, gender, and indigeneity, which, in turn, is experienced in real space and place in our cities, our buildings, and our built environments. The goal of this presentation is to discuss alternative methods of self-critique by borrowing from critical race studies, the social sciences, and contemporary Indigenous studies, among other fields, as a methodology to produce spatial equity with the hopes that an anti-racist, anti-sexist, and socially just architecture may be possible. Spatial theories and intersectional theorists will be discussed alongside workshopped critiques of recent built work as a methodology to apply these new lenses and frameworks.

Learning Objectives

  1. Arrive at an understanding and usefulness for spatialization alongside other critical race studies and social science methodologies to unpack spatial equity.
  2. Provide an introduction to the current literature and thinking around space and place, intersectionality, etc. with attention paid to contemporary Indigenous theorists and human geographers.
  3. Arrive at an understanding of how race, class, gender, and intersectionality can be used productively to inform inclusive design outcomes and processes.
  4. Imagine how prioritizing equitable change in the design of the built environment in the design office can produce effective and positive change.


Speaker(s)

Eric Nay, B.Arch., M.Arch., PhD

Dr. Eric Nay was trained as an architect and is a design theorist with more than two decades of teaching, administrative, and research experience. He is currently an associate professor at OCAD University in Toronto, where he served as an associate dean. He has taught at universities in Asia, the Middle East, and the United States, including Cornell University, the University of California, and the University of North Carolina. Eric holds degrees from the University of Toronto (PhD), Cornell University (M.Arch.), and the University of Kentucky (B.Arch.); he also studied law at Hamline University. Eric’s architectural experience includes working in architecture offices in New York City, Chicago, and California, including SOM’s Chicago office. His academic work centres on critiques of modern architecture using contemporary social science frameworks and methodologies that have included critiques of architectural pedagogy, built environments, and UNESCO World Heritage policies and practices.

 

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

26CE

Business Management–Finance

* This session is also being offered: Friday, May 29, 2020 --- 8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

Effective financial management of a firm relies on establishing a financial system and applying discipline to manage resources. If the firm’s financial management processes are not maintained regularly, the organization may run poorly and be unable to achieve its goals and objectives. This session will help you develop an understanding on how to exercise control over finances through tools such as ratio analysis, financial forecasting, and cost and profit control. 

This presentation is a version of the Finance Module offered within the OAA Course - Fundamentals of Running an Architectural Practice (formerly Starting an Architectural Practice).

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe the components of a financial management system in an architectural practice.
  2. Understand and apply the main Key Performance Indicators to set targets for, and to measure performance.
  3. Understand the concepts of financial statements and cash flow management.
  4. Discuss common financial issues facing architectural firms.


Speaker(s)

Basima Roshan, MBA, CPA

Basima Roshan leads Innovia Partners’ Finance, Change Management, and Business Transformation practice. She has an extensive background in working with Fortune-500 companies in planning and managing both cross-functional business operations and complex internal integration projects, increasing their effectiveness and profit. Basima guides Innovia’s clients through the changes in structure, processes, and people they need to meet business and market challenges. Currently, Basima advises several leading architectural firms and creative businesses to assess opportunities, facilitate strategic decisions, and drive successful implementations. She has served as interim director of finance for a large Canadian architectural practice, providing focused counsel and leadership with the goal of helping the organization achieve long-term financial sustainability. Basima has a Queen’s MBA, holds a bachelor of commerce (finance), and is a Chartered Public Accountant (CPA).

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

27CE

Maintaining Financial Sustainability and Growing Your Firm

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

As the practice of architecture evolves, firm leaders are faced with many challenges, including how to generate sustainable growth and profitability of the firm, build a capable and loyal employee team, develop future leaders, expand services, increase productivity, and stay current with professional standards and new technologies. Sustainable growth needs to be driven by healthy profits, while allowing the firm to build its culture and stay true to its purpose. There is a direct link between the firm’s financial performance and value. This is especially important when planning for internal employee succession.

Financial strength is achieved by coordinated efforts throughout the firm, from the leaders to the full staff team. On a macro level, the focus is on integrating new opportunities into the existing firm and culture. On a micro level, the focus is on close budgeting and monitoring projects and firm overheads. In addition, the compensation strategy for owners and employees is aligned with firm goals.

We will include a presentation to highlight and explain how management can use key financial metrics to monitor and assess the financial health of their firms, manage day-to-day operations, and set performance targets. We will share the results of our firm’s 2019 AED Benchmarking Survey, and also provide an update in recent trends for employee succession plans, valuation multiples, and changes to commonly used ownership structures and financing models. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand current trends in succession planning.
  2. Learn about tools for maintaining financial strength while undergoing change.
  3. Be able to set and monitor performance targets.
  4. Learn about firms successfully generating great design.


Speaker(s)

Elaine Pantel, CPA, CGA

Elaine Pantel is highly experienced in advising professional firms on a variety of business and financial matters, including succession planning, corporate structure and financing, and owner compensation strategies. She is instrumental in Shimmerman Penn’s dedicated architecture/engineering/design industry group. She has been one of the presenters at Shimmerman Penn’s annual educational events for the industry and at industry conferences for the OAA, Society for Design Administration Canada, Ontario Association of Landscape Architects (OALA), and IIDEX.

Mark McGinnis, CPA, CA

Mark McGinnis’ practice is focused on corporate and personal taxation matters for owner-managed businesses, private corporate groups, and small public companies. He advises on tax planning and minimization strategies, international taxation, foreign affiliate issues, corporate reorganizations, and estate planning for a wide range of clients. Mark has spoken at conferences and the firm’s annual Tax Breakfast on a variety of Canadian and international tax issues and has provided tax workshops for small and mid-sized firms. He is a member of the Canadian Tax Foundation

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

28CE

Top “Legal” Threats to Your Business

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

In the ever-evolving practice of architecture, awareness and understanding of the types of risks that could put your business and practice in jeopardy is critical. This presentation will take you through the top legal risks encountered by architects every day, ranging from difficult clients to bad contracts to poor pricing. Objectives of this presentation are to identify the top legal risks to an architect’s business in today’s environment and consider practical ways to manage or avoid these risks. The presentation will focus in particular on the risks associated with legal contracts, including consideration of contract clauses that may impact an architect’s compliance with its professional obligations.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify and consider legal risks that may impact an architect’s business, including difficult clients, executing a bad contract, and being improperly prepared for project risks.
  2. Identify, understand, and manage risks encountered in their business every day (particularly risks that may expose the architect to professional liability).
  3. Improve adaptability and resilience by evaluating legal risks and, in particular, contractual risk.
  4. Gain practical strategies for dealing with legal risks, including tips for dealing with difficult clients and participating in contract negotiations.

Speaker(s)

Annik Forristal, JD, B.A.Sc.

Annik Forristal is a partner at McMillan LLP practising construction law. She particularly enjoys opportunities to apply her engineering background in her practice. Annik effectively represents numerous players within the construction pyramid, providing counsel with respect to industrial, commercial, institutional, and residential projects. Her clients include owners, subcontractors, and consultant architects and engineers in matters relating to the preparation of construction contracts, contract negotiations, and complex contract claims and disputes. She is experienced with standard form construction contracts and has drafted and negotiated associated supplementary conditions, including for CCDC, CCA, OAA, RAIC, and ACEC form contracts. Annik has prepared and negotiated numerous contracts on behalf of architects and engineers for projects ranging from interior fit-outs to complex rapid transit works to master service agreements to standard terms and conditions for use on smaller projects.

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

29CE

Plaza, Centre, Hub: Catalytic Transit-Oriented Development

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

How do planners and architects maximize public and private partnerships to create successful transit-integration projects? In the next 25 years, the Greater Golden Horseshoe will increase from nine million to 14 million people. To support this growth, the Province of Ontario announced a $28 billion regional transit plan and introduced a suite of land-use policy changes designed to encourage density around transit, thereby signalling to the development industry that there is an unprecedented opportunity for transit-oriented development in the Greater Toronto and Hamilton Area (GTHA).

In this session, SvN principals Shonda Wang and Drew Sinclair will present strategies for establishing effective partnerships to catalyze transit investments that spur mixed-use developments along rail infrastructure and aging retail centres. Featuring case studies across the GTHA, the presentation will focus on how these projects are part of a broader continuum of the urban economy that includes unlocking opportunities for growth, value creation, housing affordability, and place-making. Emphasis will be given to the process that landowners, planners, and architects undertook to bring together multiple stakeholders around an integrated transit-oriented development, as well as a discussion on the planning and design strategies employed to address site-specific characteristics.

Learning Objectives

  1. Gain specific strategies for fostering an effective partnership between public and private interests in transit-integration projects.
  2. Be able to identify solutions to reposition aging retail centres and industrialized areas as thriving urban hubs, plazas, and centres.
  3. Be able to define how public transit and mobility investments can unlock opportunities for growth, including value creation, housing affordability, and place-making.
  4. Be able to identify a common set of planning and design principles in both transit and mixed-use developments that drive performance-based outcomes.

Speaker(s)

Shonda Wang, M.Sc., B.SW, MCIP, RPP

Shonda Wang is a principal and urban design lead with more than 18 years of experience in large-scale urban regeneration projects, including focused work on mobility, planning, and design. Her expertise services both public and private-sector clients who want to invest in transit-oriented intensification and create walkable, thriving communities.

Drew Sinclair, M.Arch., OAA, MAA, SAA, MRAIC

Drew Sinclair is a principal, urban designer, and architect with 19 years of experience. He is a recipient of the Canada Council’s Prix de Rome for Emerging Practitioners and was project architect for several award-winning residential projects. Drew has been recognized for design innovation in small- and large-scale projects and leads SvN’s housing, institutional, and mixed-use building practice. 

 

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

30CE

Amicable Separations; WBAL Testing and Connected Buildings

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Whole-building air leakage testing (WBALT) is becoming a requirement in many high-performance buildings. Multi-use, campus, and retrofit building scenarios involve separating interconnected spaces for WBALT, which can prove challenging. A case study of a Passive House retrofit in a campus setting will be presented.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the basic approach to whole-building air leakage testing.
  2. Understand how WBALT applies to high-performance buildings (PHI/ZCB/NZEB) in Ontario, and the value it provides.
  3. Apply above principles to more complex conditions such as interconnected buildings and multi building campus conditions.
  4. Learn about a Passive House retrofit in a campus setting.

Speaker(s)

Steve Murray, P.Eng.

Steve Murray has broad experience in rehabilitation and retrofit of existing buildings involving roofing, cladding, masonry, curtain wall, EIFS, and windows. Steve has also developed expertise with six-storey timber-framed and mass timber buildings, and the unique envelope challenges they entail. Recent work has focused on high-performance buildings pursuing Passive House and Zero Carbon Building certifications, and the Building Envelope Commissioning (BECx) processes necessary to achieve these objectives. Steve thrives in providing architect and developer clients with envelope design assistance, design review, and energy optimization advice.

Matt Carlsson, M.A.SC., P.Eng., CPHD

Matt Carlsson has been with Morrison Hershfield since 2017, specializing in building envelope consulting and whole-building deep energy retrofit strategies. Matt’s graduate studies in building science and experience in envelope condition assessments, Passive House design principles, energy modelling, hygrothermal analysis, HVAC system design, and lifecycle cost assessments gives him a holistic perspective on deep energy retrofit strategies. Matt’s master’s thesis investigated the impact of a compartmentalization and decentralized ventilation system retrofit strategy on energy use and greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions in high-rise residential buildings in Canada.

8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

31CE

Buildings and the New Triple Bottom Line

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The definition of sustainability continues to evolve and change, as do the needs and objectives of our clients and the places they develop. More and more, sustainability is expanding to include not only environmental considerations, but also social and economic. Increasingly, clients want a customized, project-specific approach. Ever-greater emphasis is being placed on health, resiliency, and also carbon neutrality as a metric for sustainability. This presentation focuses on the importance of identifying the triple bottom line for a project to satisfy not only the expectations of an owner, but also meet the performance requirements for efficiency, durability, and aesthetics.

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify triple bottom line sustainability priorities in Ontario.
  2. Find the balance between different sustainability priorities.
  3. Understand the importance of design team collaboration and mapping success.
  4. Learn about design strategies and cost-effective measures.

 

Speaker(s)

Lyle Scott, P.Eng.

Sustainability should no longer be viewed as a separate discipline that is utilized when a project is already at an advanced stage. With experience that includes more than 20 years in sustainable design and development as well as facility management and consulting, Lyle Scott has gained a broad perspective on the best sustainability strategies. He also effectively collaborates with architects, engineers, and developers to create the most appropriate sustainability solution.

8:30 AM - 12:00 PM

32CE

Renewed & Refreshed! OAA Headquarters Educational Site Visit

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

Come see in person how the OAA is “Shifting Paradigms” and leading the way toward climate stability while learning first-hand how existing buildings can be updated to meet the needs of the present and future.

Twenty years after opening its headquarters in Don Mills, the OAA decided to upgrade and renovate—rather than rebuild—the building, aiming to be carbon-neutral and meet the 2030 Challenge a decade early. The team’s considered approach to retrofitting building systems and rethinking interior spaces champions sustainability, efficiency, and a human-centric approach to design that focuses on improving the quality of our places.

Take a break from the main conference venue, and join original design architect Ruth Cawker, as well as OAA President Kathleen Kurtin and Vice Presidents Andy Thomson and Amir Azadeh, for an onsite ConEd session and site visit of the Association’s newly renovated Headquarters. Registrants will travel via shuttlebus from the Beanfield Centre to 111 Moatfield Drive to participate in a unique educational experience that takes place during a guided behind-the-scenes site-visit.

The session begins in the main Council chambers with a presentation by Cawker, who will discuss her original concept and enlightened vision for the profession’s headquarters. Her design, originally considered progressive, has proven to be timeless and has lent itself well to this major renovation. Attendees will also hear from members of the OAA’s Building Committee about the key components of the deep energy retrofit as well as the refresh of the interior spaces.

Please note that this session is not at the main conference venue. Registrants will be transported to and from the OAA Headquarters at 111 Moatfield Drive via shuttle bus departing from the Beanfield Centre. Registrants may also arrange their own transportation if they wish.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn the important role of the architectural profession with respect to pursuing climate stability, including the critical need to update existing building stock.
  2. Understand why the OAA decided to renovate and improve its headquarters building rather than build anew.
  3. Learn about the vision for the building’s original design and why it has served the continuing vision so well.
  4. Gain an understanding of the building systems used and the strategies employed for the redesign of interior spaces and how they support the OAA’s pursuit of being carbon-neutral.

Speaker(s)

Ruth Cawker, BA (Hons.), B.Arch., OAA, DEA

Ruth Cawker opened an architecture practice in Toronto in 1986, following six years at Barton Myers Associates. She holds degrees from three universities, including a degree in French and English literature and professional degrees in architecture from universities in Canada and France. Her Toronto practice won the competition for the headquarters of the Ontario Association of Architects. Following completion of the OAA building in 1992, she was appointed Chief Architect of CIBC Development Corporation, where she was responsible for CIBC's architectural guidelines for the branch network, and for six million square feet of office space. In 1995, Cawker moved to France, where she completed doctoral research (DEA) on Mediterranean gardens and landscape theory. She co-coordinated the Study Abroad program for University of Toronto’s Faculty of Architecture, Landscape & Design from 1997 to 2000, organizing studio programs in Nice and Florence. Appointed Adjunct Professor in 1997, Cawker held a variety of teaching positions in architecture over a 15-year period, including a joint option studio with Kathleen Kurtin organized around the Urban Innovations competition sponsored by the Province of Ontario’s Minister of Energy. In 2000, Cawker stepped down from her university position to devote herself to her architecture practice in Nice—Atelier Baraness + Cawker.

Kathleen Kurtin, OAA, FRAIC

Kathleen Kurtin became an architect in the early 1980s; her independent practice distinguished itself as a mid-sized architectural practice specializing in renovation within Toronto’s downtown core. The firm had a reputation for innovative and cost-effective solutions, and provided the foundation for the City of Toronto’s Live/Work guidelines. In the mid-1990s, she joined Scotiabank as its Chief Architect and Director of Design, leading a group of in-house and external architects and designers in the design and development of the bank’s real estate portfolio, both domestic and international. On retiring from Scotiabank in 2014, she re-established her independent practice. Katie went on to become a member of OAA Council in 2013; she first became president in January 2019 and began a second one-year term in 2020, with previous roles including Senior Vice President and Treasurer as well as VP Regulatory and VP Practice. Kurtin has chaired the Association’s Audit, Practice, and Interns Committees as well as its Policy Advocacy Coordination Team (PACT) and Sustainable Built Environment Committee (SBEC). She was instrumental in establishing the Safe Work Places Committee, which has sought ways to make the practice of architecture for women more equitable.

Andy Thomson, M.Arch., OAA

Andy Thomson is a green builder, architect, and outdoor-enthusiast deeply invested in the conservation of the natural world. The chair of the OAA’s Sustainable Built Environment Committee (SBEC), Andy has a long-standing commitment to advancing our profession to more efficient, intelligent, and progressive designs. Andy has completed thousands of door-fan inspections, heat loss analyses, and HRV design and installations in Germany, Canada and the United States using R2000, Passivhaus, and T24 metrics. As an internationally recognized expert-level user and trainer of BIM software, Andy has travelled widely, teaching and transitioning small and large architectural firms to the 3D visualization and modelling tools that the industry is only now, 20 years later, starting to adopt as a standard practice.

Amir Azadeh, BAS (Honours), M.Arch., OAA

Amir Azadeh is an architect with Diamond Schmitt Architects and the Vice President, Communications of the OAA, serving on the Executive Committee of the OAA Council. His responsibilities include advising the OAA president in the area of communications, chairing the Communications Committee, reviewing and monitoring the annual communications plan for the OAA, and overseeing the OAA’s various channels of communications—the Association’s awards program, digital and hard-copy publications, Conference, member engagement, sponsorship program, and outreach to both the architectural community and the general public. He serves on the OAA Council, having been elected by the membership in the City of Toronto. Amir advocates for transparency, diversity, and inclusion, as well as humility in the profession while responding to issues that rise from a city that is changing at an unprecedented rate. He has experience working on multi-unit residential, mixed-use developments, healthcare, and transit projects, and brings the perspective of issues associated with large practices to Council.

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

33CE

Reducing Your Risk with Building Science

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

According to Pro-Demnity Insurance, the largest portion of professional liability claims against architects was the result of water infiltration through the building enclosure. The damage was largely due to failure of the building envelope to keep water out or to eliminate condensation, and was a result of poor or missing design details. As buildings become more complex in their architectural design, and new products emerge for use in the building envelope, new challenges arise in designing the details where the various building components meet. Continuity of the air, vapour, moisture, and thermal control layers is crucial to a successful design, but can present difficulties for even the most seasoned designer.

As a building scientist, the presenter’s work involves the assessment of failures of the building envelope and to develop strategies to repair those failures. In turn, those repair details, as well as others, are used in the design of f and durable new buildings. This session aims to share with the audience a number of vulnerable building details, as well as the best methods for designing them to provide durable, long-term solutions while considering both form and function.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about better risk assessment.
  2. Find out how to reduce common design errors.
  3. Understand material compatibility issues.
  4. Grasp building science design principles.

Speaker(s)

Ian Miller, P.Eng., LEED AP, CCCA

Ian Miller is a project principal and the director of regional operations for South and West Ontario with Pretium, a building science consulting firm. He is also the current president of the Ontario Building Envelope Council (OBEC). Since 2004, he has dedicated his career to the pursuit of excellence in the design and repair of building enclosures of all types, including existing buildings and new construction. Miller has been a speaker for many high-profile organizations, including the University of Waterloo, the Building Envelope Forum in Toronto, and the Advanced Building Skins Conference in Switzerland.

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

34CE

TOBuilt: Crowd-Sourcing Toronto’s Architectural Heritage

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

For 13 years, the TOBuilt database has been a source of information about buildings and structures in Toronto. Founded in 2006 by Robert Krawczyk, who received honorary OAA membership for establishing the database, it was acquired in 2013 by the Toronto Branch of the Architectural Conservancy Ontario (ACOTO), which has been building on it since. TOBuilt is free and provides searchable access to over 11,400 entries containing images, information, and sources for buildings and structures. A key component of the site is that it is crowd-sourced, with ACOTO members being able to add and edit entries to contribute to this continuously expanding source of information. The At-Risk section of the database highlights threats to Toronto’s built heritage and is a tool for advocacy and conservation. After undergoing significant development in 2018 and 2019, ACOTO is eager to introduce architects to TOBuilt as a tool not only for them to use, but also one to contribute to. This session will introduce architects to the database and to discuss the opportunities it presents, and will help garner support for the site from the architecture community a key step in the long-term goal of transforming TOBuilt into OntarioBuilt—a province-wide architecture database.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn what TOBuilt is, how to use it, and how it can benefit architects.
  2. Understand how architecture firms are already using TOBuilt to include their work.
  3. See how TOBuilt can play a role in the City of Toronto’s city-wide heritage survey, and how contributions from architects could build other potential relationships with different levels of government.
  4. Learn how the architecture community can help expand TOBuilt into other communities in Ontario.

Speaker(s)

Catherine Nasmith, B.Arch.,OAA

 Catherine Nasmith Architect is a sole proprietorship specializing in heritage rehabilitation, planning, advocacy, and research. She also enjoys working with clients on private residences and other small-scale projects. Catherine works from offices in Toronto and Muskoka. Catherine has spent her career at the forefront of Canadian urbanism, with a particular interest in traditional urban form. Recently completed projects include the Alton Mill for Seaton Group, an adaptive reuse of a derelict stone mill for arts purposes. She has completed heritage conservation district (HCD) studies and plans for Harbord Village Phase I and II, and Riverdale Phase I. In progress are HCD plans for Madison Avenue and Fort York. She is frequently invited to speak on heritage topics to a wide range of professional and non-professional audiences. Catherine Nasmith Architect is the publisher of the e-journal, Built Heritage News, and writes for many other publications.

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

35CE

The Major Amendments in the New FIDIC Contracts

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The forms of construction contract prepared and published by the International Federation of Consulting Engineers (FIDIC) are the most popular international standard forms. They have been used for many years throughout the world. One of the distinctive features of the FIDIC forms is the independent role of a contract administrator, referred to as Engineer, which is a role often performed by an engineer or an architect. In 2017, the FIDIC books underwent a significant evolution with the release of the second edition of its “Rainbow Suite.” One of the major amendments in the new editions is the enhanced role of the Engineer when administering the contract and determining claims between the parties. This presentation aims at informing the audience about the main amendments in the FIDIC books with a focus on the role of the Engineer by drawing some comparisons with local standard forms used in Canada.

Learning Objectives

  1. Gain an understanding of the latest developments in international construction law.
  2. Gain an understanding of the distinctive features of the FIDIC Books.
  3. Gain insight into the enhanced role of the contract administrator under the new FIDIC books.
  4. Gain an understanding of how the role of the contract administrator under the FIDIC books is different from that under local forms used in Canada.

Speaker(s)

Dimitar Kondev, PhD

Dr. Dimitar Kondev is an associate at the International Arbitration Group of White & Case, Paris, and a lecturer in International Construction Law at the Aarhus University, Denmark. His practice includes construction law and international commercial arbitration. He has experience in various sectors, including commercial development, energy, and infrastructure. Dimitar is the author of the monograph, “Multi-Party and Multi-Contract Arbitration in the Construction Industry” (Wiley Blackwell, 2017), and he has published several articles on construction law and dispute resolution in a number of international journals. Dimitar participated in the legal review of the new FIDIC books released in 2017 as well as in the FIDIC Emerald Book released in 2019. He has been ranked by Who’s Who Legal (Construction 2019: Future Leaders) as an extremely intelligent and diligent practitioner who “always keeps his focus on the practical issues” and possesses “deep insight into cross-border issues”. 

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

36CE

Accessibility Design Beyond the Building Codes

 

* This session is also being offered: Friday, May 29, 2020 --- 10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The Ontario Government has set a goal of making the Province fully accessible to people with disabilities by 2025. And recently, the Minister for Seniors and Accessibility announced that the Government of Ontario is investing $1.3 million, over two years through a new partnership, to remove accessibility barriers in the built environment. The session will walk attendees through the Government of Ontario’s action plan and delve deeper into the barrier-free design requirements in the building codes to assess if its application alone is enough to reach the government’s ambitious goals. The session will further introduce supplementary design tools, such as the Rich Hansen Accessibility Certificate Program, that can be used to better serve clients and improve accessibility. The session will conclude with case studies and best practices that exceed/enhance the codes, as well as demonstrate how accessibility can be successfully achieved through the implementation of additional tools. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Identify how the Government of Ontario is taking action to remove barriers for people with disabilities.
  2. Assess the limitations of the barrier-free design requirements in the Ontario Building Code (OBC), National Building Code of Canada (NBCA), and the Integrated Accessibility Standards (IAS).
  3. Discover other barrier-free supplementary design tools, such as the Rick Hansen Accessibility Certificate Program, that can better serve the client and improve the built environment.
  4. Reinforce the notion that as designers of the built environment, it is our duty to design for the entire population, always with accessibility in mind.

Speaker(s)

Stanis Smith, Architect AIBC, FRAIC, AIA, LEED AP BD+C, LTCL

Stanis Smith is Stantec’s executive vice president for innovation, an acknowledged expert in the field of airport terminal design, and the leader of Stantec’s global airport practice. A passionate advocate for universal design, he chairs the Advisory Board to the Rick Hansen Foundation. He is a frequent presenter at national and international conferences on accessibility and other topics affecting design and the practice of architecture. Examples include Harvard Graduate School of Design (Boston 2011), Universal Access (Seattle, 2012), Transed (Lisbon, 2015), Rick Hansen Foundation (Toronto 2017 and 2018), and BOMA (Newfoundland, 2019).

Elektra Vrachas, OAA, MRAIC, BCC

Elektra Vrachas is a member of the OAA and serves on its Sub-Committee on Building Codes and Regulation (SCOBCAR). She has over 25 years of architectural experience and expertise in all aspects of the design and construction industry for various building types, including extensive experience with various provincial building codes, regulations, and standards including the Ontario Fire Code and National Fire Code. Her keen understanding of the building code and current trends in the construction industry is a direct benefit to the life safety, health, fire protection, and accessibility of the building and to the client. 

 

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

37CE

Appreciating Alternative Ways of Understanding Landscape

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Colonial urbanisation in Canada and abroad has emerged a standardized landscape architecture and planning approach with little consideration for alternative ways of understanding landscapes. The built environment isolates relationships, creating a disconnect that further perpetuates the problem of climate change, and lack of appreciation for natural systems.

Master’s students from the University of Guelph School of Environmental Design and Rural Development will share perspectives on researching, engaging, and designing collaboratively with Indigenous knowledge and people who are experiencing climate-related trauma and grief. Through the lenses of therapeutic-managed retreat and collaborative waterscape design and management research, both studies support renewed paradigms for design and planning practice.

Research conducted in New Zealand reveals opportunities for Maori knowledge to inform alternative ways of managing and designing waterscapes. Interviews with practitioners reveal bicultural mechanisms in forms of urban design guidelines, policy, and infrastructure. Similarly, studies of climate-related trauma and grief focus on cultural and emotional drivers present in planning for managed retreat, prompting practitioners to consider the importance of emotion and participant involvement within all phases of projects. Researchers will provide lessons learned from practitioners in New Zealand and people experiencing climate-related trauma and grief.

Learning Objectives

  1. Reflect on effective ways to situate oneself as a practitioner in a position to learn, interpret, and work with alternative ways of knowing and seeing landscapes based on the researcher’s experiences.
  2. Gain an understanding of effective research methods that consider alternative sociocultural and ecological contexts and how these methods can be adopted and applied within their own design and planning process.
  3. See examples of collaborative policy and physical design interventions from the New Zealand context that showcase collaborative approaches, procedures, and outcomes that support bicultural perspectives on landscapes.
  4. Gain an appreciation for the relevance and importance of incorporating and considering sociocultural, emotional, and eco-emotional dimensions of landscape within the development of a project to achieve likely unforeseen design and planning.

 

Speaker(s)

Emily Bowerman, Landscape Design-Planner

Emily holds a bachelor’s degree in landscape architecture and an M.Sc. in planning from the University of Guelph. She has pursued research in both Canada and New Zealand to understand Indigenous landscape and water values and how they influence design and planning outcomes. She is currently a landscape design-planner in Halifax and has continued interests in expanding the role of landscape architecture to address water systems design and management, relationships between rural communities and extractive industries, and the ability for landscape architectural interventions and visualizations to enact policy reform.

Quinn Howard, Master of Landscape Architecture Student

Quinn holds a bachelor’s degree in International Development and Health Sciences from the University of Ottawa and an MLA from the University of Guelph. Through embodied research, Quinn has engaged in the work of climate mourning to understand the role of design and planning practitioners can hold in the face of climate-related loss and damage. She is currently pursuing further education in climate adaptation, community engagement, and therapeutic planning with interests in ecological memorial design, ecosystem-based management, and sustainable subsistence food networks.

 

10:30 AM - 12:00 PM

38CE

Enclosure Design and TEDI Targets. TGS, Zero Carbon, and PH

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

“Per cent better than the code” is a fading metric, giving rise to a new performance paradigm: thermal energy demand intensity (TEDI). Simply defined, TEDI is the measure of heating energy required to offset enclosure losses and to heat fresh ventilation air. Thus, enclosure performance is no longer subject to trade-offs with highly-efficient mechanical systems—it is paramount to achieving success. 

TEDI has been adopted as a compliance metric for the Toronto Green Standard (TGS) and CaGBC’s Zero Carbon Building (ZCB) program and has been a requirement of Passive House projects since inception. Coupled with the requirement to incorporate thermal bridging into whole-building thermal performance values, TEDI is changing the way we design and construct buildings.

This session will provide a background on TEDI, various step code and green building TEDI targets, prototypical enclosures to achieve TEDI targets, the impact of thermal bridging on whole-enclosure performance values, and design tools to help you meet your objectives.

Learning Objectives

  1. Obtain an overview of the TEDI metric and how it is measured.
  2. Develop an understanding of TEDI targets in the Toronto Green Standard (TGS) and CaGBC Zero Carbon Building program.
  3. Discuss approaches to Passive House design, including from PHI and PHIUS.
  4. Explore typical thermal bridging design conditions and effective thermal bridging report tools.

Speaker(s)

Scott R. Armstrong, Dipl Arch Tech, BSS, CET, LEED AP BD+C

Scott Armstrong is passionate about buildings: their design and construction, ongoing performance, deterioration and failure, and, ultimately, their renewal. His projects have spanned commercial, institutional, heritage, recreational, residential, and neighbourhood development in Canada, the Caribbean, and the Middle East. Scott brings 20 years of experience to WSP’s building science and sustainability projects with expertise in high-performance buildings, building enclosures, facades, existing building repair and renewal, roofing and green roofs, and integrated design. A LEED Accredited Professional, past-secretary and board member of the CaGBC Greater Toronto Chapter, a Building Science Specialist (BSS), and Certified Engineering Technologist (CET), Scott successfully bridges the traditional gap between architectural and engineering disciplines and is frequently invited to speak publicly on topics such as enclosure design, high-performance building design, and existing building retrofits.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

39CE

Design in the City, for the City, with the City

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

As part of the shifting paradigms for architects, today’s work in urban and urbanizing context, design for the cities and neighbourhoods, with a keen eye to context integration, resilience, sustainability, and liveability, with increasing participation, in close integration with other city-building disciplines, becomes a more prevalent and enduring trend.

This session, presented by architects/urban designers from the Council for Canadian Urbanism—a national, interdisciplinary organization advocating for sustainable, liveable, authentic Canadian urbanism and urban design—will follow this trend across the country, from B.C. to the East Coast, and illustrate it with key contemporary projects.

Issues such as designing sustainable communities, transit-oriented development, design for the urbanization of the suburbs, design for public infrastructure, tools for promoting good urban design, and design excellence in the planning and development process will be addressed by experienced urban design practitioners.

The session will discuss the role of architects to promote city-building and design excellence in Canadian urbanism and will illustrate and debate issues such as public realm, placemaking, and the role of architects, working with allied professions, and advocacy, public engagement, and urban design review panels.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn and discuss current urban design practice, key projects across the country with a focus on city-building, sustainable, transit-oriented development, and resilient infrastructure integration.
  2. Learn and discuss multi-disciplinary work with allied professions for sustainable placemaking and design excellence in city-building, in particular public infrastructure landscape architects, planners, engineers, advocates, and officials.
  3. Learn about design tools for context support and integration to achieve good city-building and design excellence—urban design guidelines, design review, and urban design panels.
  4. Learn and discuss engagement in the design process, including the use of participatory urban design tools and processes in advocacy for design culture and public engagement

Speaker(s)

Alex Taranu, FRAIC, FCIP, OAA, RPP

Alex Taranu is an urbanist and architect with extensive experience in Canada and abroad on a wide variety of projects including downtown revitalization, urbanization of suburban areas, sustainable, transit-oriented development, urban design review, heritage integration, and project management. He is a strong advocate for sustainable and healthy urbanism. Alex is the founder/director of the Council for Canadian Urbanism, a Fellow of the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada (RAIC) and the Canadian Institute of Planners (CIP), a licensed architect in Ontario, and a Registered Professional Planner.

Joyce Drohan, MRAIC, Architect AIBC

An architect and urban designer, Joyce Drohan is recognized for designing livable communities with ambitious environmental strategies. These include masterplans for Vancouver’s celebrated Olympic Village, River District, and Edmonton’s Blatchford Redevelopment—winner of a Globe Award for Urban Sustainability and RAIC medal for Urban Design. Recently, she built the City Design Studio, providing urban design leadership at the City of Vancouver. Joyce is an adjunct faculty member at the University of British Columbia where she teaches design studios in the Master’s of Urban Design program

Eric Turcotte, OAA, OAQ, MRAIC, MCIP, RPP, LEED AP BD + C

Eric Turcotte is an urban designer, planner, and architect. He is a partner at Urban Strategies Inc. and has more than 23 years of experience in Canada, the United States, and Europe, working on downtown and neighbourhood revitalization plans, transit-oriented developments, and large-scale institutional and corporate master plans. Eric is the president of the Council for Canadian Urbanism.

Peter Soland, OAQ, AAPQ, CSLA, ADUQ, LEED Green Associate

Peter Soland is an architect, landscape architect, and urban designer. Founder of the Montreal urban design firm Civiliti, he has over 25 years of experience in the analysis, design, and construction of public places, including studies in large-scale infrastructure. 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

40CE

Carbon-Neutral Buildings: Innovative Strategies

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

After a decade of research in prefabricated design and manufacturing, architect Andy Thomson has discovered a formula to simplify both construction and labour inputs in residential design. Coupled with BIM technology and successive refinements of prototype buildings, this has led to an increase in building areas with an almost inverse effect on building costs. Discover how in this fascinating discussion, which expands on projects featured at the presenter’s talk at the 2019 OAA Conference.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about costing, climate, and externalities (atmospheric basics and climate as related to architecture, simplified method to estimate project costs, considering the Social Cost of Carbon [SCS], and establishing a baseline and target for energy performance [TEUI]).
  2. Understand the technologies in existing buildings and durability (a brief history of building science, corrections [two steps forward, one step back], and reviewing issues with high-performance buildings, moisture and organic).
  3. Learn about advantages and disadvantages of prefabricated construction and review how strategies of miniaturization and ephemeralization in design can reduce building impacts, utility burden, and costs.
  4. Review strategies for existing buildings.

Speaker(s)

Andy Thomson, M.Arch., OAA

Andy Thomson is a green builder, architect, and outdoor-enthusiast deeply invested in the conservation of the natural world. The chair of the OAA’s Sustainable Built Environment Committee (SBEC), Andy has a long-standing commitment to advancing our profession to more efficient, intelligent, and progressive designs. Andy has completed thousands of door-fan inspections, heat loss analyses, and HRV design and installations in Germany, Canada and the United States using R2000, Passivhaus, and T24 metrics. As an internationally recognized expert-level user and trainer of BIM software, Andy has travelled widely, teaching and transitioning small and large architectural firms to the 3D visualization and modelling tools that the industry is only now, 20 years later, starting to adopt as a standard practice.

Geoffrey Turnbull, OAA, MRAIC, LEED AP, CPHD

Geoffrey Turnbull leverages a broad background in design, business, film, and computation to advocate for an evidenced-based, progressive approach to design and sustainability. As director of innovation, Geoffrey leads the firm’s research group, KPMB LAB, through research projects, speculative design proposals, and engagement with a broad group of stakeholders, integrating new ideas and skills into KPMB’s professional practice. As a project architect, Geoffrey has worked on projects through all phases of design and construction, including his work on the LEED Platinum-certified Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario head office in Toronto and the recently completed Wilson School of Design for Kwantlen Polytechnic University.

David Constable, OAA, LEED AP, CPHD

David Constable joined KPMB Architects in 2006 after working in the United States and Ireland. While leading a series of complex design projects, his focus has increasingly been toward empirical evaluation of the energy and carbon produced by architecture and how intelligent architectural strategies can minimize or eliminate carbon while maintaining a high level of design. His projects include a series of commercial, residential, and institutional projects in Toronto and New York City, including The Globe and Mail Offices, the LEED Platinum Elementary Teachers’ Federation of Ontario, and all phases of the expansion and retrofit of the Brearley School, an independent school for girls in New York City.

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

41CE

ISO 9001:2015—QMS for Architects

3.0 ConEd Learning Hours
3.0 AIA CES LU

As an introduction to ISO 9001 and quality management for architects, this session will provide an introduction to ISO 9001:2015, risk management, and the processes necessary to achieve ISO Certification, as well as an overview of why this standard is applicable, and of benefit, to architecture practices.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about ISO 9001:2015.
  2. Understand why you should use this standard in your practice.
  3. Learn the steps to implementing the standard.
  4. Review a case study.

Speaker(s)

Toon Dreessen, OAA, FRAIC, AIA, LEED AP

Toon Dreessen is a graduate of Carleton University and recipient of the Alpha Rho Chi medal. A member of the American Institute of Architects (AIA), he was inducted into the RAIC College of Fellows in 2016. He leads the company and is responsible for award-winning projects in infill development, laboratory, research, industrial, and high-profile projects. Architects DCA is a company with roots dating back more than 40 years and is ISO 9001:2015 Certified.

Sonia Allaham, QMS Auditor; Dip Business Marketing

Sonia Allaham is a graduate of the business marketing program at Algonquin College. Responsible for the company’s ISO 9001 quality management program, her welcoming presence is enhanced by her ability to support all aspects of the construction management process. Sonia’s attention to detail and organizational skills keep the project teams on time and efficiently structured.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

42CE

Beyond Utilization: The Business of Architecture

* This session is also being offered: Friday, May 29, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The realities of operating a profitable studio necessitates open conversation beyond design excellence. Learn how a successful 150-person, 45-year-old practice broke the standard of keeping the business of architecture siloed and behind closed doors. Move beyond utilization rates as the measure of success by empowering project accountants, project managers, and studio staff to leverage the power of a more accessible and intuitive ERP software. The results have led to increased transparency, improved client relations, and a highly effective approach to operations that increases profitability, allowing resources to be invested in technology, learning, and advancing the practice.

Architectural practices are businesses. Through an open, honest look at the least-talked about parts of our profession, learn how our practice model increased the ability to provide a better, more inclusive staff experience by putting successful business strategies, and business management, at the forefront of a practice. Attendees will learn to challenge the limitations of operational software, ensuring they best serve their studio’s needs and understand how to implement the competitive advantages gained by educating staff on fees, billing, and operational standards. A practice where everyone is invested in efficiency and operations, but not pressured by harsh expectation, is one that thrives. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand how a new practice model can increase the ability to provide a better, more inclusive staff experience by putting successful business strategies at the forefront of your practice.
  2. Learn to challenge the limitations of operational software, ensuring they best serve their studio’s needs
  3. Appreciate how to leverage a competitive advantage by educating staff on fees, billing, and operational standards.
  4. Leave with the understanding that internal and external silos need to broken and a practice where everyone is invested in efficiency and operations, but not pressured by harsh expectation, is one that thrives.

Speaker(s)

Ellen Bensky, BA, Dip.Arch.Tech. (Hon), CanBIM P1

Ellen Bensky contributes on a daily basis to the advancement of architectural technology and virtual design not only in her firm, but also industry-wide through her initiatives and dedication. Passionate for education, Ellen is especially proud of spearheading an internal academy that provides a comprehensive learning and teaching platform for the firm. Through her current role, Ellen is able to engage daily in the process of successfully leveraging business needs and architectural realities, driving her quest for operational excellence. An experienced speaker, she has presented at local and international at colleges and universities, as well as industry events including KA Connect 2018 and 2019, the Royal Architectural Institute of Canada’s (RAIC’s) 2018 conference, and BiLT Australia/New Zealand 2019. She has several engagements scheduled in Canada, the United States, and Europe for the remainder of the year. Ellen is the proud recipient of the CanBIM 2017 Professional Achievement Award.

Steve Nonis, B.Arch., OAA, AANB, AAPEI, MRAIC, CanBIM P3, LEED AP

A partner at Turner Fleischer, Steve Nonis is driven to achieve the optimal connection between technology and design. At the forefront of the firm’s BIM initiatives, he was instrumental in TF’s pioneering efforts to apply 3D design processes. Passionate for sharing knowledge, Steve has spoken as part of Autodesk University, at local and international education institutions, and recently at the RAIC’s 2018 Festival.

 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

43CE

Wellness v. Architecture: What We Build and How We Practise

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

“Wellness,” “well-being,” “mindfulness”—we are bombarded from all sides. Our clients ask us for our expertise on it, our smartphones recommend articles and products, and our grocery stores and fitness centres ping us with reminders. But beyond the trends, the buzzwords, and cultural fixation, how does wellness intersect with space, and how could it better intersect with the practice of architecture?

This session introduces attendees to a selection of existing and emerging research on how wellness is being introduced to space, the impact of design on users, and how methods emerging from UX design and human-centric design strategy can being utilized to inform our design approach.

In addition, the session will explore how architects can better integrate wellness practices into our “practice”, exploring how health and well-being approaches are being utilized within the design and construction industry, and how these conversations can apply to our day-to-day and future practice. 

There are no easy answers when it comes to wellness (just as drinking a green smoothie or buying a succulent will not instantly create well-being), but there are elements that can be considered or woven into our approach to better serve our practice and our client’s wellness aspirations.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how wellness initiatives are being integrated into architecture and other industries.
  2. Understand how space impacts user well-being through project case stories.
  3. Consider how wellness can be integrated with design projects.
  4. Apply wellness tactics to how we practise, both as individuals and firms.

Speaker(s)

Erin Corcoran, OAA, AIA

Erin Corcoran is an internationally experienced architect and design strategist with a passion for truly understanding her client’s needs using a mixed analytical and empathy-based design approach. Currently a part of Gensler’s Boston Team, she works to develop solutions to complex space and cultural challenges for public and private sector workplace clients, building owners, developers, post-secondary education groups, healthcare institutions, and community organizations.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

44CE

Changing Tides: The Role of Copyright in Architecture

* This session is also being offered: Friday, May 29, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Copyright in architectural works has historically been a dormant field, but recent events indicate that it’s anything but. In 1993, the Copyright Act was amended such that architectural works could more easily gain copyright protection. However, for reasons that will be explored, it was only in September 2017 that we saw the real potential of these provisions—a structural engineering firm was awarded $750,000 in damages for copyright infringement. The industry was set for another copyright-related shock when the Supreme Court of Canada concluded in 2019 that the Crown owned published plans of survey submitted to Teranet.

These cases underscore the relevance of copyright in the world of construction, and signal a shift in the legal landscape, which necessitates that architects adopt a proactive approach to the historically inactive world of copyright in architectural works. Industry players should dust off old presumptions and precedents and gain a working understanding of the Court’s current stance on copyright in the construction space. This lecture will equip architects with knowledge on how copyright intersects with the life-cycle of construction projects, keys ownership issues, licensing best practices, and defences to infringement, all the while providing practical tips that can be immediately implemented in their practice, such as how to register copyright, implement appropriate copyright notices, and critical contract provisions and reservations of rights.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand what is copyright, how it arises, and what you can do with it in your practice.
  2. Learn how to navigate the ownership and licensing issues in copyright and architectural works, and the consequence of waiving moral rights.
  3. Understand what constitutes copyright infringement, and the application of fair dealing as a defence to copyright infringement.
  4. Gain best practices in protecting and commercializing copyright in your architectural works and how to avoid pitfalls.

Speaker(s)

Christie Bates, HBA, M.Phil. (Cantab), B.C.L, LLM

Christie Bates is an associate in the Intellectual Property Group at Cassels Brock & Blackwell LLP. She has a broad practice in the licensing, protection, enforcement, and acquisition of intellectual property (IP). As her practice involves both solicitor and litigation work, she can strategically advise on each stage in the lifecycle of her clients’ intellectual property assets. Christie has presented and authored several papers on the intersection of IP in non-traditional areas, such as copyright and construction.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

45CE

Intensification In Maturing Neighbourhoods: Ottawa’s Example

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Maturing urban neighbourhoods are under increasing demand to contain much of our needed growth in municipal housing stock in order to curb sprawl and transition cities to sustainable modes of travel. This intensification can be regulated to respect and enrich existing valued neighbourhood characteristics, improve individual health, reduce environmental impact, improve social interaction, and provide a wide range of housing options for a range of household incomes. In many municipalities, we are experiencing an environmental crisis, a housing affordability crisis, a rental housing shortage ,and an epidemic of loneliness.

New Urbanism, Smart Growth, and Form Based Code advocates have come up with lots of bold new ideas. It’s time for practical solutions at a regulatory municipal level, and architects must play a key role in analyzing and formulating these regulations. The goal is to produce new housing typological and streetscape development patterns within maturing neighbourhoods that meet today’s needs and fulfil the intent of the bold ideas that have been present within the planning industry for many decades. Ottawa is beginning this work. It is an exiting time for our nation’s capital.

Learning Objectives

  1. Review and reflect on the recent history of infill housing using Ottawa examples.
  2. Learn about the new zoning approaches that are being considered/modelled for Ottawa’s maturing neighbourhoods.
  3. Understand the interdependence of walkability, social engagement, affordability, household diversity, and environmental sustainability as neighbourhoods evolve.
  4. Trace the path from new regulations to development patterns and housing typologies.

Speaker(s)

Rosaline Hill, BES, B.Arch., OAA, MRAIC

Rosaline Hill is principal architect and owner of Rosaline J. Hill Architect Inc., an Ottawa-based full-service architectural practice with a focus on infill housing, from singles to apartment buildings. Rosaline’s thorough knowledge of Ottawa’s Official Plan, zoning bylaw, and other regulations allows for design projects that win approvals and make the city a better place to live. She is an active member of the home-builders associations and has volunteered for the past decade providing input on upcoming residential infill bylaws changes. Her firm is now engaged by the City to analyze housing development patterns in R4 zones in order to simulate new ‘Missing Middle’ development patterns. With an intimate knowledge of Ottawa’s infill housing market, purchaser expectations, and evolving regulations, Rosaline is able to propose and model new housing development patterns to meet City growth and environmental targets.

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

46CE

Double Duty: Urban Stormwater Management

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

As cities grow and experience an increase in both urban density and environmental issues related to climate change, it is essential that public spaces are designed to be socially, environmentally, technically, and economically balanced. Several local and urban case studies will explore innovative stormwater (SWM) management at different scales with a balance of green and grey solutions as well as highlight landscape-architect-led design processes for unique, site-specific solutions.

Projects will include Edgeley Pond + Park in Vaughan, which is currently a forgotten SWM pond that supports an urbanized Black Creek with 767 hectares of upstream drainage and 54 hectares of untreated urban SWM. The new park will protect and enable development for over 5,000 new residents while providing a signature amenity park space.

Over the last 100 years, downtown Hamilton has grown around the 28-hectare Gage Park. Challenged with aging infrastructure, repeated surcharging, and property damage, the City approved an innovative solution to bring urban stormwater from adjacent streets into the historic park.

With land value at a premium, Toronto’s 23-hectare East Bayfront neighbourhood needed a precinct-wide urban stormwater solution. Learn how the design team created a unique solution that was built in a 21-metre right-of-way.

Learning Objectives

  1. Explore urban trends in innovative stormwater management.
  2. Learn how an urban precinct-wide stormwater management system was designed.
  3. Reconsider the value of grey versus green infrastructure.
  4. Learn how landscape architects engage multi-disciplinary teams to achieve common goals with a focus on environmental stewardship and creating exceptional spaces for people.

Speaker(s)

Yvonne Battista, OALA, CSLA, ASLA, LEED AP

Yvonne Battista is a landscape architect and associate at DTAH where she has spent 16 of her 20-year career designing, managing, and implementing landscape projects with a focus on stormwater management, urban streetscapes, and parks. Having worked on many of DTAH’s most complex landscape and stormwater management efforts, Yvonne finds design solutions to infrastructure challenges that are both technically and aesthetically outstanding. She has served as a guest lecturer and studio critic at the Universities of California, Oklahoma, Guelph, Waterloo, and Toronto as well as presented nationally and international. 

2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

47CE

Maintaining Financial Sustainability And Growing Your Firm

* This session is also being offered: Thursday, May 28, 2020 --- 8:30 AM - 10:00 AM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

As the practice of architecture evolves, firm leaders are faced with many challenges, including how to generate sustainable growth and profitability of the firm, build a capable and loyal employee team, develop future leaders, expand services, increase productivity, and stay current with professional standards and new technologies. Sustainable growth needs to be driven by healthy profits, while allowing the firm to build its culture and stay true to its purpose. There is a direct link between the firm’s financial performance and value. This is especially important when planning for internal employee succession.

Financial strength is achieved by coordinated efforts throughout the firm, from the leaders to the full staff team. On a macro level, the focus is on integrating new opportunities into the existing firm and culture. On a micro level, the focus is on close budgeting and monitoring projects and firm overheads. In addition, the compensation strategy for owners and employees is aligned with firm goals.

We will include a presentation to highlight and explain how management can use key financial metrics to monitor and assess the financial health of their firms, manage day-to-day operations, and set performance targets. We will share the results of our firm’s 2019 AED Benchmarking Survey, and also provide an update in recent trends for employee succession plans, valuation multiples, and changes to commonly used ownership structures and financing models. 

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand current trends in succession planning.
  2. Learn about tools for maintaining financial strength while undergoing change.
  3. Be able to set and monitor performance targets.
  4. Learn about firms successfully generating great design.

Speaker(s)

Elaine Pantel, CPA, CGA

Elaine Pantel is highly experienced in advising professional firms on a variety of business and financial matters, including succession planning, corporate structure and financing, and owner compensation strategies. She is instrumental in Shimmerman Penn’s dedicated architecture/engineering/design industry group. She has been one of the presenters at Shimmerman Penn’s annual educational events for the industry and at industry conferences for the OAA, Society for Design Administration Canada, Ontario Association of Landscape Architects (OALA), and IIDEX.

Mark McGinnis, CPA, CA

Mark McGinnis’ practice is focused on corporate and personal taxation matters for owner-managed businesses, private corporate groups, and small public companies. He advises on tax planning and minimization strategies, international taxation, foreign affiliate issues, corporate reorganizations, and estate planning for a wide range of clients. Mark has spoken at conferences and the firm’s annual Tax Breakfast on a variety of Canadian and international tax issues and has provided tax workshops for small and mid-sized firms. He is a member of the Canadian Tax Foundation.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

48CE

Client Acquisition: Tools for Winning Great Projects

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

For many architects, business development is the second most dreaded exercise after trying to run the business! Rainmaking is a skill that rarely comes naturally or easily to architects. We’re going to change that! In this fast-paced presentation, participants will get real tools to attract the type of work and clients they are seeking. Participants will learn to use free and low-cost software and marketing tools to set up a client-acquisition process that helps them get an edge in winning the best opportunities.

Learning Objectives

  1. Be able to clearly articulate your firm’s target audience (project and client).
  2. Follow and track your marketing and business development plan.
  3. Understand new practice models that merge the business and practice of architecture.
  4. Walk away with a 12-month marketing and business development plan.

Speaker(s)

Enoch Bartlett Sears, AIA, Licensed California Architect

Enoch Bartlett Sears is a sought-after speaker and subject matter expert on the business of architecture. After years working as a successful architect, he left the profession to focus on helping architects and designers build highly profitable and impactful practices. He’s the author of the book, Social Media for Architects, and host of the #1-rated interview podcast for architects, Business of Architecture, where leading architects share strategies for success. (The podcast has more than 1 million downloads.) Enoch has personally helped 100+ firm owners located both in Canada and abroad create practices of impact and fulfilment that align with their vision.

 

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

49CE

MBA 101 for Leaders in Architecture: Management Fundamentals

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

This session is focused on the key aspects of managing an architectural firm from a business system’s best practices approach. It provides attendees with a solid foundation for understanding the operations of a firm by providing insights into the basic skills necessary to critically analyze a firm’s operating performance and practices. It focuses on how work and information flows, and how the design and management of a firm’s processes interact to determine a firm’s cost structure and its ability to compete effectively. We conclude with how to become a respected manager by effectively managing personnel to increase productivity while lowering turnover.

We will explore the important interconnections among leadership, strategy, finance, operations management, and the professional development of staff. If you are an emerging leader in architecture and are looking to enhance your managerial skill set, or are an experienced principal looking for a refresher on core management fundamentals, this session is for you. Join us for a rich discussion and leave with tools to use immediately back at the office!

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn the top best practices for business management to ensure a healthy and profitable practice
  2. Understand the importance of internal consistency with respect to the business plan, job plan, and completion plan.
  3. Gain an appreciation of the seven most important Key Performance Indicators (KPIs) to determine a firm’s performance (includes a summary write-up on the KPIs and how to calculate them).
  4. Broaden your managerial skill set to inspire your personnel while earning respect in the workplace (includes a coaching best practices checklist for immediate use back at the office).

Speaker(s)

Paul Smith, MA (Econ.), MBA

An experienced and engaging speaker, motivator and leader, Paul Smith is the president and founder of Flywheel, a Toronto-based boutique management consulting firm. He obtained an MA in Economics from the University of Western Ontario, and earned an MBA (Honours) from the Richard Ivey School of Business. Paul has spent 20 years working side by side with senior management to navigate long-term change efforts. He spends most of his time listening to his clients and their employees, and is routinely asked to speak at important industry events.

 

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

50CE

Fabrication: The other “F-word” in Architectural Praxis

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Fabrication is no longer a term isolated to the technical innovators of the AEC industry—it is a ubiquitous component of academia and rapidly gaining traction in contemporary practice. As with normalizing of sustainable design and use of BIM, the bespoke is yet another expectation on contemporary practice. File-to-factory is an inevitability. This session proposes where and how architectural practices acquire this knowledge base is neither standardized nor immediately accessible.

Architecture has always been the creative manipulation of data in fabricating the built world. At this point in history, access to the design knowledge, technological acumen, and skilled services do not drive architectural innovation—they are necessities for professional survival. The classic model of “design, draft, and deploy” with a conventional construction palette is giving way to a seamlessness file to factory paradigm where creative mass customization is at a designer’s disposal. Drawing on examples and voices from academia, practice, fabricators, and construction, this session delves into the opportunities architectural praxis will undertake as it increasingly adopts a file-to-factory paradigm.

Learning Objectives

  1. Describe and identify the resources, including knowledge bases, technologies, and services, available and required to operate in a file-to-factory paradigm.
  2. Recognize the costs and benefits in transitioning to such a paradigm.
  3. Assess gaps in your operations and develop a workflow integrating options for support.
  4. Determine appropriate resources for implementation within an architectural practice.

Speaker(s)

Eric Bury, B.Arch., B.ES

Architecturally trained, Eric Bury is skilled in providing unique solutions for uncommon challenges using both 2D and 3D digital tools in a variety of media. Prior to joining Eventscape, an award-winning architectural fabricator, he was a senior associate, designer, and project manager with Philip Beesley Architect—an interdisciplinary experimental architecture and design firm specializing in the creation of large-scale immersive, responsive, kinetic environments.

In his range of roles in a variety of industries (including architecture, engineering, graphic design, and interactive art), Eric developed a passion for communicating ideas and creating work for diverse audiences. From conception to implementation, focusing on the overall vision as well as the detail, Eric is able to guide Eventscape’s clients in the best and most cost-effective solution for their projects including guidance on material suitability, fabrication processes, architectural integration, and installation sequencing.

Vincent Hui, BES, M.Arch., MBA, MRAIC

Vincent Hui teaches studio, structures, and digital tools at Ryerson University’s Department of Architectural Science as well as researching computer-aided design, building information modelling (BIM), parametric design, advanced simulation, and rapid prototyping. As the head of Ryerson’s Architectural Design Lab, [R]ed[U]x Lab, Vincent has overseen the design, fabrication, and exhibition of innovative design work around the world. 

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

51CE

21 WOMEN Recalibrating History at the Centre of the City

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

In an image-rich presentation, this session explores the place architecture, art, and design have in reframing and redefining history. La Place des Montrealaises is a public space that will pay tribute to the varied historical contributions of women in Montreal’s evolution. Poetically merging architecture, landscape design, and art methodologies, this project creates a series of moments in homage to women who have helped define the city. The primary design gesture is an architectural blade transforming the site from its former use as a highway into a perennial meadow. A landscaped slope rises toward the south, defining the horizon and framing Montreal’s City Hall. New spatial relationships on the site extends through a series of experiential strategies reframing notions on city-building inclusive of women’s contributions. Against the monumental cityscape, Place des Montréalaises honours a diversity of women who have helped shaped its history and evolution. The new urban space is a generative and restorative topography drawing on Montreal’s collective memory in recognizing and reframing the historical past to be realized in 2022.

Design leader Andrew King (lemayLAB) and conceptual artist Angela Silver bring the experience of their 30-year trans-disciplinary practice to frame their winning proposition for the international urban space design competition.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about how in trans-disciplinary research methodologies, architecture, art, and landscape architecture converge in critically driven design process.
  2. Explore nuanced commemoration strategies as the project moves farther in framing a space where all women, are recognized in a rebalancing of the city’s commemorative spaces.
  3. Experience broader urban design linkages through public space systems—Place des Montrealaises is part of a string of key public spaces moving east west across the city, aligned with the Ville Marie expressway; this system is re-defining the city as a green-scape, with Place des Montrealaises acting as its fulcrum at its intersection with city hall.
  4. Understand how the repairing of large infrastructural elements can mend a city.

Speaker(s)

Andrew King, FRAIC, Prix de Rome

Andrew King is chief design officer at Lemay and leads the lemayLAB. He is one of Canada’s most recognized design leaders, a Fellow of the RAIC, and professor in practice at the Peter Fu School of Architecture, McGill University. He has evolved a critically recognized practice model that converges speculative small practice, large-firm design leadership, and academic research. He recently led the design team for Montreal’s new CHUM super-hospital, garnering more than 25 design prizes and awards. Professional recognition includes the Canada Council for the Arts Prix de Rome, three Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence, and two AIA Progressive Architecture (P/A) Awards of Excellence. He has led design projects across Canada, in the United States, and Europe. King has held visiting chairs in design at McGill University, Carleton University, and Danish Royal Academy of Art and has lectured on his work across Canada and abroad.

Angela Silver, MFA, PhD candidate

Angela Silver is a visual artist and a proud laureate with Andrew King and Lemay of the international design competition Places des Montrealaise at Champs Des Mars. Based in Montreal, she has a co-teaching research practice with Andrew King at McGill. Simultaneously, she is a PhD candidate in cultural studies at Queen’s University, exploring archaeologies of inscription. She draws, performs, prints, and reworks information systems and moribund printing tools exhibiting this research internationally. Angela has shown her work at Wordfest International Writers Festival, at DAC in Brooklyn, in Rome, at the Textile Research Centre Leiden in the Netherlands. Her work can be found at angelasilver.com

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

52CE

Construction Act Prompt Payment & Adjudication: It’s Here!

* This session is also being offered: Wednesday, May 27, 2020 --- 4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

The lecture and slide presentation are tailored toward architects in their role as designer, prime consultant, and payment certifier, and address the impact on architectural practice of the changes to Ontario’s Construction Act. 

The presentation will cover:

  • transition provisions and how they work;
  • proper invoices;
  • prompt payment;
  • the new Construction Act forms;
  • adjudication and the Ontario Adjudication for Construction Contracts (ODACC) process; and
  • OAA document 600 indemnity language and scope and client indemnity and sub-consultant responsibility.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn about the transition provisions and provisions under the Construction Act now in force as of October 1, 2019.
  2. Understand the impact prompt payment will have on the architect’s role.
  3. Understand the significance of adjudication, the process, and the Ontario Adjudication for Construction Contracts (ODACC).
  4. Learn what indemnity and sub-consultant provisions owners may seek to amend in OAA document 600—and why that matters to architects.

Speaker(s)

Catherine DiMarco, LLB

Catherine DiMarco is a partner with the Toronto-based boutique law firm of Heal & Co. LLP. She has practised law for nearly 15 years, primarily dealing with construction claims and general civil litigation. Catherine is certified as a Specialist in Construction Law by the Law Society of Ontario (LSO), and she obtained the Osgoode Certificate in Construction Law in 2012. She is also an executive member of the Ontario Bar Association Construction and Infrastructure Law Section, and on the board of directors of the Canadian Construction Association (CCA) as well as its Executive Committee; she previously served a two-year term as a member of the board of directors of the Canadian Association of Women in Construction (CAWIC). Catherine’s practice encompasses many different sectors of the construction industry. She represents owners, general contractors, subcontractors, and suppliers, as well as design and engineering professionals, both on the claims side and in the defence of claims. Catherine has defended public authorities, including municipalities, in matters involving allegations of negligent design, supervision, and inspection.

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

53CE

NON-BUILDING: Architecture Without Facade

* This session is also being offered: Friday, May 29, 2020 --- 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

This presentation will explore how projects do not need a facade or iconic expression to be compelling public architecture. Investigating the idea of “NON-BUILDING” at various scales and programs, the idea of architecture as experience rather than an image or built form will be presented through three public projects with three distinct programs. Through engaging design and pedagogical approaches, Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, MRAIC, RIBA, partner at Provencher_Roy, will present how abandoning the notion of facade altogether can have a transformative effect without calling on traditional notions of iconography, shifting how we see design in architectural practice. This lecture should be of particular interest to architects dealing with projects in a heritage context, with very rich campus-like or urban settings.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how a new project (McCall MacBain House on McGill University’s downtown campus), meant to be about the transformation of education, stands out amongst all the heritage by being designed as an experience.
  2. Understand how design can be a pedagogical tool in democracy, and fundamental to the creation of a meaningful project (National Assembly) that will create common ground amongst stakeholders that have very different agendas.
  3. Investigate how architects can shift the discourse surrounding a project (Alexandra Pier) and redefine its objectives so it becomes a public endeavour.
  4. Experience how architecture creates a consciousness of context and presence as it moves away from the desire to be an image—a comparison of architectural photography versus social media images will help understand the difference between architecture vision and architectural experience.

Speaker(s)

Nicolas Demers-Stoddart, Architect

Nicolas Demers-Stoddart joined the Provencher_Roy team in 2011 and has since played a top-tier design role. He has worked as design manager on numerous projects, including Gare Viger and the reception pavilion of the Québec National Assembly, the latter the winner of an Award of Merit at the 2016 Canadian Architect Awards of Excellence. He was also involved in the design of the Iberville International Maritime Terminal and Alexandra Pier; Carré Saint-Laurent; and the 1:X exhibition. Before signing on with Provencher_Roy, Nicolas worked at OMA New York, most notably on the design of the Marina Abramovic Institute for the Preservation of Performance Art (MAI).

4:00 PM - 5:30 PM

54CE

First Principles to Deep Energy Retrofits in Old Buildings

1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Late 19th and early 20th Century masonry buildings make up the majority of our urban cores, providing significant cultural, heritage, and embodied energy resources to their communities. To meet the challenges of a net-carbon and energy neutral future, replacing or demolishing all underperforming heritage buildings is neither desirable nor advised given their significant contribution to the identity of our towns and cities, resilience, robust assembly, and adaptability to new uses that have proven their character and attractiveness over time.

This presentation is intended to dispel confusion and describe the steps one should take when facing a heritage energy retrofit. First, principles to manage air leakage and moisture control—the most significant energy, heat loss, and deterioration risks to heritage buildings—will be described. A “don’t” list of things one should never do with a heritage building retrofit will follow. Short descriptions of three retrofit approaches, as applied to case study examples, will illustrate the concepts and impacts to energy reductions as compared to status quo conditions.

Learning Objectives 

  1. Understand the basics and risks of retrofitting old buildings.
  2. Learn the 3 Ds—the “don’t” list for moisture control in a heritage building (i.e. deflection, drainage, and drying).
  3. Understand three retrofit approaches: maintain existing assembly, interior insulation assembly, and ventilated masonry wall retrofit / dynamic buffer zone approach.
  4. Hear case study examples demonstrating these approaches as applied to monumental, commercial, residential, and utility heritage building types and the impact to energy use reductions.

Speaker(s)

Eric Charron, B.A.S., M.Arch., OAA

Eric A. Charron is an architect with Diamond Schmitt Architects with seven years of experience with the conservation, restoration, and retrofit of heritage buildings in Ontario. He is currently project lead of the retrofit and adaptive reuse of the historic Weston Bakery building in Toronto to residential use. His previous experience with Spencer R. Higgins Architect Inc. included the restoration of the Dome of the Saskatchewan Legislature in Regina, as well as historic analysis and retrofits to Queen’s Park in Toronto among notable projects.

8:15 AM - 12:00 PM

05T

Downtown Mississauga Tour

3.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

 

Downtown Mississauga is a dynamic, rapidly changing urban neighbourhood that attracts creative and talented people to live, work, and play. It is a place where you can share and embrace new ideas, cultures, and experiences. Located in the heart of the city, with easy connections to the rest of the city, the Greater Toronto Area, and beyond, downtown Mississauga has more than 30,000 residents and 20,000 jobs within walking distance of the major centre of civic government, cultural amenities, and an established regional retail facility.

Highlights include the renowned Marilyn Monroe Tower, the iconic Mississauga City Hall and newly redesigned Celebration Square, developments by Daniels, Amacon, Rogers/Urban Capital, and Oxford in addition to residential towers, college buildings, award-winning and LEED projects, grade-related and live/work units, comfortable pedestrian mews, public art; outstanding parks, active open squares, and well-executed streetscapes.

This tour has substantial walking.

8:45 AM - 12:00 PM

06T

Art & Architecture on the Spadina Line

3 Unstructured Learning Hours


This tour explores the stories behind the art and architecture along the Spadina subway line. This one-of-a-kind subway ride will explore the stories behind the underground gallery that is the Spadina Line! From grounded Brutalist hubs to playful multi-coloured stops, come explore the line’s unique stations—all drastically different from one another and featuring integrated artwork in fun and unexpected ways. Along the way, we will discuss the collaborative process between architects, artists, and engineers to achieve these beautiful and functional buildings, as well as some of the challenges faced when integrating art into public settings.

This tour requires attendees to purchase their own TTC fare.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

9:30 AM - 12:00 PM

07T

Funky Queen Street Photography

2.5 Unstructured Learing Hours

This tour explodes with photo opportunities of virtually every kind—street art, people, architecture... you name it. Architecturally, Queen West is a typical main street in any Ontario town, but there the similarities end. Here is where you can capture the energy of a great city in motion.

You will walk and streetcar along Queen West for two hours on this enviro-friendly tour. The route includes City Hall, University Ave, CTV, John St, Grange Park, The Cameron House, The Horseshoe Tavern, Spadina Ave, and Graffiti Alley. Your tour guide will be David Goorevitch, a professional photographer with 25 exhibitions to his name, including Art Miami context. David has a degree in film & photography from Ryerson University, and will offer assistance with technical and aesthetic guidance.

This tour has substantial walking.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

 

2:00 PM - 5:30 PM

08T

North York City Centre

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

A walking tour that explores the buildings and landscapes of North York City Centre, the unabashedly modern downtown created during the 70s, 80s and 90s. From High-Modernist interior streets to Post Modern spires, grand public spaces to award-winning buildings, join us as we explore the unique architectural and civic legacy of this planned core and share the stories behind its significant structures. Along the way we will discuss some of the challenges facing North York today, as well as the exciting proposals that promise to shape its future. This tour requires attendees to purchase their own TTC fare.  This tour has substantial walking.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

2:15 PM - 4:45 PM

09T

Liberty Village Neighbourhood - The Evolution of Toronto's Employment Lands Tour

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

This Liberty Village Tour will showcase projects that exemplify the changing nature of the workplace in this historical Employment Lands neighbourhood. Preserving key heritage elements from the days of industrial use and merging them with modern sustainable elements, these buildings speak to the current needs of modern tech-savvy tenants while maintaining the existing character of the neighbourhood. This tour will explore the rich history of brick-and-beam factory buildings and how that typology has been reinvented with Ontario's first new mass timber project, 80 Atlantic.

The focus will be an architectural design in heritage areas, bringing forward the design thought process leading to the creation of several projects that thoughtfully connect old and new architecture.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

2:15 PM - 4:45 PM

10T

Canoe Landing Community Campus Tour

2.5 Unstructured Learning Hours

The realization of Canoe Landing Campus in downtown Toronto spans more than two decades of urban planning and changing needs in one of Canada’s highest density “vertical neighbourhoods.” Recognizing a vital need for a missing social and educational nexus in the city’s booming downtown core, the new facility houses a 165,000-sf community recreation centre, public and Catholic elementary schools, and a childcare centre within one park campus, thereby reducing the building footprint and maximizing open space.

The multi-use Canoe Landing Campus is an important final piece of development knitting this vertical community together. Sustainability and resiliency are prominently integrated, including maximizing green roof opportunities and an introduction of photovoltaic panels to generate 10% renewable energy to meet the highest level of the City of Toronto Green Standards. Visible from the neighbouring residences above, the dynamic “active” roof of the campus appears to merge with Canoe Landing Park, creating the visual sense of a more extensive park, and a layered site with multiple public zones and play areas.

Tour attendees will experience a fully integrated community/education hub that is one of the most anticipated buildings in recent years. It is very likely to be the harbinger of future community-based urban development in Toronto and other metropolitan centres.

All tours will depart from the Hotel X lobby. Please gather at least 15 minutes prior to your tour time.

 

12:00 PM - 1:45 PM

Keynote Luncheon Featuring Zita Cobb

 

 2 ConEd Learning Hours

Zita Cobb, founder and CEO of Shorefast and innkeeper of the Fogo Island Inn, will be this year’s keynote speaker. Zita Cobb had a successful career in the high-tech industry before returning to her native Fogo Island and founding Shorefast with the mission to serve community wellbeing by building and sharing new models of economic development that are based upon the inherent cultural and physical assets of place.

To read more about Zita Cobb, visit shorefast.org and fogoislandinn.ca

Sponsored by: Ontario Wood WORKS!
                         Canadian Wood Council

Décor sponsored by: Brampton Brick Ltd





 

6:30 PM - 7:30 PM

Celebration of Excellence Awards Ceremony

Join us at the Toronto Event Centre as we celebrate the achievements of the 2020 OAA Award Recipients.

Our Master of Ceremonies for the evening will be Television host and comedian Adam Growe.

For over 25 years, Adam has been performing in radio, television and on-stage. In addition to hosting 8 seasons of Cash Cab Canada, Adam is an accomplished stand-up comedian, starring in Just for Laughs, Comedy NOW!, and COMICS!, and appearing on CBS’s, Star Search and Comedy Central’s, Premium Blend.

His career has progressed to include online interactive media, keynote presentations and his own one-man shows. For more than 8 years, Adam facilitated leadership courses for organizations throughout North America as a communications Consultant.

Bringing together his comedy experience and love for trivia, Adam currently tours with The Adam Growe Quiz Show, his unique and hilarious live show giving people from the audience a chance to win cash or prizes out of his pocket on-stage. His brand of trivia is also being developed into an App, and Adam currently hosts a Twitter version of his trivia game featuring videos, polls, predictions and cash & prizes.

The 2020 Awards presentation will include:

Best Emerging Practice
Design Excellence
Michael V. and Wanda Plachta
Lieutenant Governor's Award
Lifetime Design Achievement
Order of da Vinci
People's Choice Award

Shuttle Bus Service  will be available for Conference delegates.

Shuttle Bus Schedule:

5:45 pm: depart for the Awards Reception and ceremony
7:15 pm: depart for the ARCHIFÊTE evening
9:00 pm: continuous return service from Toronto Event Centre to Hotel X
11:50 pm: last shuttle to Hotel X

Meeting Locations:
Meet in Hotel X front lobby for transportation to the Toronto Event Centre
Meet in Toronto Event Centre front entrance for transportation to Hotel X


 

7:30 PM - 11:59 PM

Archifête

 

Join us at the Toronto Event Centre as we end the 2020 OAA Annual Conference with some fun! All members, as well as industry leaders and allied professionals, are invited to join us for the Archifête as we celebrate our honourees. The evening will be filled with entertainment, music, food and drink stations. This party promises to be a premier networking event. You definitely don't want to miss it!

 This event is sponsored by:
Entertainment by: 

Décor by: HALIO 
 
Stations at this event are generously sponsored by: