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63CE - One Spadina Crescent

25 May 2018 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM



1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

Richard Sommer, the dean of the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design (DFALD) at the University of Toronto along with Katherine Faulkner, OAA, AIA, of NADAAA, will present the design and construction process of the new DFALD building at One Spadina Crescent at the University of Toronto.

Learning Objectives

  1. Learn how to solve/encourage pedestrian traffic on complicated urban sites.
  2. Discover the latest implementable sustainable systems and strategies.
  3. Integrate the inspiration of a historic Gothic building into building systems.
  4. Gain a better sense of studying spaces of learning needs.

Speakers

Katherine Faulkner, OAA, AIA, LEED AP, and Richard Sommer, Dean, Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto

Katherine Faulkner is president and a founding principal of NADAAA. Since 2011, she has directed efforts to expand the firm’s institutional projects, master plans and international projects; in tandem, she has also expanded the office’s prototyping facilities with a focus on creating a better dialogue with the building industry. With 20 years of mid and large firm experience, she has expanded the firm’s market reach while establishing NADAAA’s position as an internationally recognized design firm. A 1987 graduate of Dartmouth College, Faulkner received her M.Arch. from Harvard’s Graduate School of Design.

Richard Sommer is an architect and urbanist with over 20 years of experience as a practitioner, educator and theorist, and is the dean of the Daniels Faculty of Architecture, Landscape and Design at the University of Toronto. His design practice, research and writing take the complex physical geography, culture, technology, politics and historiography of the contemporary city as a starting point for creating a synthetic, cosmopolitan architecture. In addition to his focus on design in the context of broad trends in urbanization, Richard has been engaged in a long­term, multi­faceted research project examining the transformation of monument making in societies aspiring toward democracy, with a particular focus on America. His professional and academic activity in urban design is diverse and includes serving from 2005 to 2010, as the O’Hare Chair of Design and Development and as a Visiting American Scholar at the University of Ulster, Belfast. In this capacity, he worked with government agencies, academics and other groups to develop proposals for the design of Northern Ireland’s cities and towns as they emerge from The Troubles.