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35CE - Borrow, Hack and Ship: Expanding Architectural Practice

24 May 2018 2:00 PM - 3:30 PM



1.5 ConEd Learning Hours
1.5 AIA CES LU

This panel discussion will focus on three distinct methods by which architects might embed greater opportunities in design practice. They include (1) the hybridization of borrowed intelligence from other industries in the production of low-cost housing and community work, (2) the incorporation of newly hacked toolsets that reveal potentials for alternative means of design and production, and (3) the leveraging of manufacturing tools from industry to expand commonly held modes of architectural practice. The purpose of the discussion is not to advocate a single approach toward an architecture of intelligence, borne of consensus. Rather, it is to clearly convey the lessons learned from years of application of each approach, so as to better understand and advocate for a range of potentials and new forms of architectural practice.

Learning Objectives

  1. Understand the value of systematically embedding intelligence within various design processes.
  2. Understand the implications and value of design processes that hybridize borrowed intelligence from other industries, especially as it relates to the production of low-cost housing and community work.
  3. Understand the implications and value of design processes that hack toolsets in order to reveal potentials for alternative means of design and production.
  4. Understand the implications and value of design processes that leverage tools and approaches from diverse industries in order to expand commonly held modes of architectural practice.

Speaker

Scott Shall, AIA, Karl Daubmann, AIA, and Jim Stevens, AIA

Scott Shall is an associate professor and the associate dean of the College of Architecture and Design at Lawrence Technological University (LTU) and the founding director of the International Design Clinic (IDC), a registered non-profit that realizes socially responsive creative action with communities in need around the world. Shall’s work in this arena has been disseminated widely, including publications by the AIA Press and the University of Indianapolis Press, and exhibitions at the Venice Architecture Biennale, the Sheldon Swope Museum of Art and the Goldstein Museum of Design.

Karl Daubmann is an architect at the forefront of digital design. He is the dean of the College of Architecture and Design at Lawrence Technological University. His architectural practice DAUB (design, architecture, urbanism, building) focuses on expanding the relationship between design and technology, particularly between digital/robotic fabrication and building. Daubmann is a Fellow of the American Academy in Rome. Between 2010 and 2014, he was the vice president of design and creative director for Blu Homes, where he led a multidisciplinary team that developed green, prefab houses that folded for shipping across North America.

Jim Stevens is an associate professor of architecture at Lawrence Technological University’s College of Architecture and Design, where he is the founding and acting director of makeLab, a digital fabrication and design studio. As director, Jim oversees research, publication and industry-sponsored design projects. Additionally, he conducts frequent makeLab workshops and lectures across the United States and in China, Europe and India. Coauthor of the book Digital Vernacular, Architectural Principles, Tools and Processes (Routledge 2015), Jim is currently a PhD candidate at Polis University, Albania and the University of Ferrara, Italy.