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AGO Talks: The Liveable City? Housing

03 April 2019



Time: 7:00 PM - 8:00 PM | Wednesday April 3, 2019

Location: Baillie Court, Art Gallery of Ontario | 317 Dundas St. W, Toronto ON

As Impressionism in the Age of Industry takes viewers on a journey through a period of immense change in 19th century Paris, we invite speakers across various disciplines to enter into conversations around urgent issues facing Toronto today: work, affordable housing, transportation and the cost of leisure.

On April 3, the focus is on housing as urban planner and researcher Cheryll Case, architect/planner John van Nostrand, Baroness Von Sketch Show co-creator and renovicted tenant Aurora Browne, and Toronto Star Affordable Housing Reporter Emily Mathieu discuss how best to bridge the gap between knowledge and action.

The Liveable City? series is a partnership between the AGO, Toronto Public Library and the Toronto Star.

Aurora Browne is proud to be one of the co-creators, writers, executive producers and stars of CBC’s award-winning Baroness Von Sketch Show. Aurora has been honing her sketch chops since 2000 when she was hired by Toronto’s Second City. Since then she has appeared on The Writer’s Block, Man Seeking Woman, Orphan Black, The Gavin Crawford Show, InSecurity, and Corner Gas among others. She was also a co-creator, co-writer, executive producer and co-star of the hit web series Newborn Moms, which appeared both on CBC’s and ABC’s digital channels. Aurora has been nominated for many Canadian Comedy Awards for her work in Toronto’s red hot live sketch and improv scene, and in 2008 won the CCA for Best Female Improviser. She was a nominee for the 2000 Tim Sims Encouragement Fund Award. Her son thinks she is hilarious.

Cheryll Case is the founding principal of CP Planning, a ground breaking urban planning firm that digs deep into addressing the urban conditions that affect access to housing, work, and play. She specializes in designing for inclusive conversations that build relationships between various industries within the non-profit, private, and public sectors. To facilitate conversation, Cheryll uses research, data analysis, and storytelling to describe community relationships with land. Since graduating from Ryerson University’s Bachelor of Urban and Regional Planning in 2017, Cheryll has been a driving force in the public discourse about community planning and belonging. Most recently, she completed Housing in Focus, a community planning exercise which engaged a wide variety of underserved residents in conversations about a human rights approach to land use planning.

Emily Mathieu is an award-winning journalist at the Toronto Star. In 2016, she launched the Star’s affordable and precarious housing beat. Her focus is rental housing legislation, Toronto’s ultra-tight rental market, the city’s emergency shelter system, the relationships between tenants and landlords and the rights and living conditions of marginalized people. Prior to focusing on housing, Emily worked within the Star's investigative unit reporting on mortgage fraud, lax standards within Toronto's taxi industry and the absence of standard sexual violence policies at Canadian colleges and universities – part of a team effort that was recognized by the Canadian Hillman Awards. Emily is a graduate of the University of Toronto and the University of Western Ontario, where she earned her Master’s in journalism.

John van Nostrand is the Founding Principal of SvN, a team of architects, planners, community developers and urban designers immersed in the practical art and science of building resilient communities. Over the last four decades, he has been the driving force behind the firm’s domestic and international architecture, planning and urban design practice. John has been widely recognized for his expertise in the planning and design of affordable housing and community infrastructure, as well as transportation and transit infrastructure. Recently he founded Parcel Developments which provides home-ownership to households earning annual incomes from $25,000 to $125,000. His work has been recognized with a number of national and international awards, including the World Leadership Award for Town Planning, World Habitat Award from UN Habitat, and many City of Toronto Urban Design Awards. In 2004, John was awarded the Jane Jacobs Award for “Ideas That Matter.”