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NEST (Winter Stations 2018)

07 Feb 2018
 
Image Credit: Henry Mai
Architectural Credit: Design Credit: Adrian Chîu, Henry Mai and Arnel Espanol
 
In this post of our winter blOAAg series, “Temporary Architecture: Pavilions, Structures and Follies,” we are given an opportunity to look at the design and construction process of one of this year’s Winter Stations installation by a group of Ryerson University’s Architectural Science students.

Designers: Adrian Chîu, Henry Mai and Arnel Espanol (Ryerson University)
Location: Toronto, Ontario
Instagram: @ryerson_nest, @WinterStations
 
From the Designers: 

NEST is driven by the idea of creating a space of comfort and introspection within a system of complexity and disarray. Inspired by the impromptu structures that people would construct during public demonstration, it uses readily available materials, but in unconventional ways, to create a unique form and experience. The overwhelming nature of information and everyday life is expressed through the chaotic texture and asymmetrical form of the installation. Composed of modular cells that contain a weave of colourful webs, NEST provides both shelter and playful moments of light and shadow within the space. A rigid structure and chaotic exterior is contrasted with the more calming simple interior. The internal experience allows the visitor to momentarily step away from the noise, pause and view the world through a clear lens.





Concept Sketches
Image and Design Credit: Adrian Chîu, Henry Mai and Arnel Espanol



Scaled 1:10 Model of NEST
Image Credit: Henry Mai
Design Credit: Adrian Chîu, Henry Mai and Arnel Espanol
 

Assembling the scaled model
Image Credit: Henry Mai
 

CNC file preparation
Image Credit: Henry Mai

CNC routing the cell structure
Image Credit: Henry Mai
 

Assembling the top cell 
Image Credit: Henry Mai
 

Hand construction of NEST
Image Credit: Henry Mai

Hand construction of NEST
Image Credit: Henry Mai
 

NEST Cell
Image Credit: Henry Mai
 

The NEST Team
 

This post forms part of our winter blOAAg series, “Temporary Architecture: Pavilions, Structures and Follies,” which explores architecture made for a temporal situation. Check out the other posts in our series for more great buildings across the province!
 
 
 

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