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Leeward Fleet (Ice Breakers 2017)

02 Feb 2018
 
Image Credit: Andy Barrow
Architectural Credit: RAW Design
 
In this post of our winter blOAAg series, “Temporary Architecture: Pavilions, Structures and Follies,” we take a look at the public art installation for “Ice Breakers” by Toronto-based RAW Design.

From the Designers 

Artist: RAW Design
Type: Public Art Installation
Organizer: Winter Stations (RAW Design / Curio / Ferris + Associates)
Information: https://icebreakers.winterstations.com/
Location: Toronto, Ontario
 
Created by Winter Stations, Ice Breakers is an invited competition in response to the stretch of urban waterfront between Yonge Street and Bathurst Street. Ice Breakers can be established as a leading-edge cultural event as it is more reflective of its urban settings and speaks to the goals and aspirations of the Waterfront BIA community. Like its name suggests, the event intends to break the ice or provide a break from the cold by employing temporary installations along the waterfront.


Reference Image 
Image Credit: Toronto Archives
Design Credit: N/A 


Design Concept Image 
Image Credit: RAW Design
Design Credit: RAW Design 
 
An installation conceived by RAW Design, Leeward Fleet celebrated Toronto’s rich harbour history through three pivoting structures in Canada Square that were constructed by Anex Works. Inspired by ice and sailboat technology, enamel masts held up sails composed of recycled sail material donated by a local craftsman. Each of the masts served as a sculptural reference to the days prior to ferry transportation. Strategically located, the structures were intended to move in the wind and animate the square up close and from afar.


Ice Breakers 2017: Leeward Fleet on the Waterfront 
Image Credit: Andy Barrow
Design Credit: RAW Design 
 
Ice Breakers 2017: Leeward Fleet on the Waterfront
Image Credit: Andy Barrow
Design Credit: RAW Design

This post forms part of our winter blOAAg series, “Temporary Architecture: Pavilions, Structures and Follies,” which explores architecture made for a temporal situation. Check out the other posts in our series for more great buildings across the province!
 
 
 

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